Tag: social media for academics

This weekend I went back to my CV for the first time in a year and a half, condensing it down from nine pages into two pages for a particular application. Any work on it is always a strange and alienating experience. As Barbara Ehrenreich has put it, CVs “should have an odd, disembodied tone, […]

I’m increasingly hopeful that I’ll submit the second edition of Social Media for Academics to Sage next week, meeting a deadline which I suspect my editor had expected I would break. The book is six months overdue, I’ve broken countless deadlines and the impending date was only agreed after a period in which we agreed […]

I’m currently in Zurich preparing for a panel on social media, organised by the CareerElixier group. I was sent some questions in advance and I’m writing up responses in order to gather my thoughts.  Why is social media a subject for academics? Social media is a subject for academics because it is a subject for […]

Notes for a talk at this event on Saturday.  In the not too distant past, the use of social media in higher education was seen as a curiosity at best. Perhaps something to be explained or inquired into but certainly not something deemed relevant to scholarship. Yet it’s now increasingly hard to move without encountering the […]

I asked this question on Twitter earlier today. Here are some of the answers I got: @mark_carrigan helps me join a multitude of intellectual dots and weave global threads of thinking and connection — Trish McCluskey (@trilia) April 12, 2016 @mark_carrigan @readywriting Connections with others, link btwn academic & field outside academia, exchange new work… […]

The powerful thing about telling a story is that it gets beyond the level of sim­ply listing facts about yourself. Not that there’s anything wrong with this; in a way it’s like a story because you choose which facts you present and the order in which you present them. But telling a story places them […]

This is an extract from Social Media for Academics  To talk of ‘networking’ raises the inevitable question of what your ‘network’ is and why it matters. This is a theme which cuts through the book given that the network is so crucial to social media: without a certain critical mass of users, it’s difficult for […]

It’s brilliant to find so many people tweeting about my book. I’ve attached some of the tweets below. If they convince you that you should buy a copy, this is the cheapest place to buy it online. Social Media for Academics: https://t.co/CTWrg5wXaH @mark_carrigan This is so cool! — Aparna Gonibeed (@apugonnab) April 20, 2016 New […]

This is a really useful reflection by Andy Miah on social media in academic life. It leads to a focused discussion about the significance of social media for editors of academic journals, but it has some more general reflections prior to this.

An interesting talk by George Veletsianos whose recent book, Social Media in Academia, I’ll review in the near(ish) future. I found it a thought provoking read but I want to critically engage with his conception of ‘networked scholars’ in order to better articulate why I prefer to conceptualise this quite straight forwardly in terms of ‘academics’ i.e. […]

This interesting article (HT Nick Couldry) explores the challenge faced by Facebook in imposing standards on a user base distributed around the globe: As Facebook has tentacled out from Palo Alto, Calif., gaining control of an ever-larger slice of the global commons, the network has found itself in a tenuous and culturally awkward position: how to […]

From The Boy Kings, by Katherine Losse, loc 184: The interjection of distant voices on friends’ walls was always vaguely unreadable, unpredictable, illicit. “Let’s play this weekend,” a girl would post on the wall of a guy I knew, suggestively, and it felt weird to read, not because I didn’t think girls liked him but […]

From Liquid Surveillance: a conversation by Zygmunt Bauman and David Lyon, pg 22-23. I heard Bauman make these arguments at re:publica earlier this year and was rather impressed. As ever with him, it’s immensely impressionistic but I think he identifies something important that has been substantiated by other work, most obviously Alice Marwick’s ethnography of […]

The final stages of Social Media for Academics are giving me flashbacks to the end of my PhD. I’ve drunk so much coffee that I can barely sit down, I have Forces of Victory on repeat and I’m alternating between thinking the nearly finished work is brilliant and concluding that it’s utterly shit. Over the weekend, I […]