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  • Mark 10:00 am on September 30, 2012 Permalink | Reply
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    Using NVivo: a one day crash course for qualitative researchers, Fri 9th Nov 

    9:30am to 5:30pm, Friday 9th November at the Manchester Digital Laboratory 

    Suitable for complete beginners or those who need a refresher, this intensive one day course will cover all the core functionality of NVivo:

    • An overview of the software
    • Managing and importing your data
    • Coding strategies and techniques
    • Analysing visual and multimedia data
    • Using memos effectively
    • Using annotations and see also links
    • Relationships and modelling
    • Querying your data
    • Managing the complexity of your project

    £50 for PhD Students, £100 for all others

    Press below to go to the booking form:

    Eventbrite - Using NVivo: a one day crash course for qualitative researchers

    All participants will receive an electronic resource pack which covers the material from the course and provides guidance on continuing to develop proficiency with the software. To take part you will need a laptop with NVivo installed. A 30 day free trial of NVivo 10 is available from the QSR website.

    To keep costs down lunch is not included. But the venue is in the heart of Manchester’s famous Northern Quarter and is surrounded by excellent cafes and bars. There will also be LOTS of tea and coffee.

    If you are a wheelchair user and are interested in this training event, please contact me and I’ll try to arrange a session which can accomodate you.

    Mark Carrigan has taught NVivo extensively at the University of Warwick and acted as a NVivo trainer and consultant for the EU FP7 funded MYPLACE project. For more information see his website. Please feel free to get in touch via e-mail or twitter if you have any questions.

     
  • Mark 3:00 pm on September 28, 2012 Permalink | Reply
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    The simplest (and most effective?) campaign ad ever 

     
  • Mark 12:47 pm on September 25, 2012 Permalink | Reply
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    Using NVivo: a one day crash course for qualitative researchers, Fri 9th Nov 

    9:30am to 5:30pm, Friday 9th November at the Manchester Digital Laboratory 

    Suitable for complete beginners or those who need a refresher, this intensive one day course will cover all the core functionality of NVivo:

    • An overview of the software
    • Managing and importing your data
    • Coding strategies and techniques
    • Analysing visual and multimedia data
    • Using memos effectively
    • Using annotations and see also links
    • Relationships and modelling
    • Querying your data
    • Managing the complexity of your project

    £50 for PhD Students, £100 for all others

    Press below to go to the booking form:

    Eventbrite - Using NVivo: a one day crash course for qualitative researchers

    All participants will receive an electronic resource pack which covers the material from the course and provides guidance on continuing to develop proficiency with the software. To take part you will need a laptop with NVivo installed. A 30 day free trial of NVivo 10 is available from the QSR website.

    To keep costs down lunch is not included. But the venue is in the heart of Manchester’s famous Northern Quarter and is surrounded by excellent cafes and bars. There will also be LOTS of tea and coffee.

    If you are a wheelchair user and are interested in this training event, please contact me and I’ll try to arrange a session which can accomodate you.

    Mark Carrigan has taught NVivo extensively at the University of Warwick and acted as a NVivo trainer and consultant for the EU FP7 funded MYPLACE project. For more information see his website. Please feel free to get in touch via e-mail or twitter if you have any questions.

     
  • Mark 4:52 pm on September 24, 2012 Permalink | Reply
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    BSA Presidential Event: Understanding the financial crisis: sociology, political economy and heterodox economics 

    BSA Presidential Event, together with FESSUD and the British Library

    ‘Understanding the financial crisis: sociology, political economy and heterodox economics’

    British Library Conference Centre, London

    Monday 8 October 2012; 10am – 4.10pm

    The BSA President, Professor John Holmwood, announces a one-day seminar  on the financial crisis, organised in collaboration with Dr Andrew Brown of FESSUD (an EU 7th Research Framework Programme funded project on ‘Financialisation,  Economy, Society and Sustainable Development’ hosted at Leeds University Business School).

    Speakers include:

    Andrew Brown (Leeds University Business School)

    Mathew Bond (London South Bank University)

    Julie Froud (Manchester Business School)

    Juan Pablo Pardo-Guerra (LSE)

    Malcolm Sawyer (Leeds University Business School)

    David Spencer (Leeds University Business School)

    Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths University of London)

    Zsuzsanna Vargha (LSE)

    The financial crisis of 2008 has been longstanding in its consequences and seemingly intractable in its resolution. It is widely understood to have arisen from the de-regulation of financial institutions and the emergence of increasingly complex financial instruments as well as a culture of risk associated with high rewards. The crisis took the discipline of economics by surprise leading to the Queen’s question of why there had been a failure to predict it. One response from a seminar organised by the BritishAcademy concluded that it was “principally a failure of the collective imagination of many bright people, both in this country and internationally, to understand the risks to the system as a whole” (http://media.ft.com/cms/3e3b6ca8-7a08-11de-b86f-00144feabdc0.pdf). The present seminar is an exercise in alternative imaginations, both in accounting for the crisis and in providing alternatives.

    Further information: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/bsa-presidential-event.aspx)

    Direct link to online booking: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/event/eventBooking.aspx?id=EVT10239).

     
  • Mark 4:23 pm on September 24, 2012 Permalink | Reply
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    New Seminar from CRFR: Disclosing the trauma of child sexual abuse: a gender analysis 

    Disclosing the trauma of child sexual abuse: a gender analysis
    Wednesday 24th October 2012
    2pm-5pm
    Free to attend however places are limited
    St Trinneans Room, St Leonards Hall, Pollock Halls of Residence, Edinburgh
    http://www.crfr.ac.uk/events/gbvseminar.html

    Child sexual abuse occurs with both girls and boys, although much more
    research has been done with girls. In her qualitative investigation Ramona
    Alaggia interviewed both female and male survivors of child sexual abuse to
    understand their experiences of disclosing their victimization. While there
    were strong similarities in disclosure patterns, findings showed noteworthy
    differences connected to gender and disclosure. The overall trend for both
    genders was toward delaying disclosure, and for those who tried to disclose
    in childhood, attempts were often made in indirect ways with inadequate
    responses. However, men reported difficulty disclosing because they feared
    being viewed as victimized (weak), complicit in the abuse, or having their
    sexuality questioned. Women’s difficulties centered on feeling conflicted
    about responsibility for the abuse, and they more strongly anticipated being
    blamed or not believed. Individual factors were one consideration, however,
    broader environmental conditions such societal and cultural elements have an
    impact on disclosure from an ecological perspective.

    To reserve a place at the seminar please complete the on-line booking form
    below:
    http://www.crfr.ac.uk/events/gbvseminarbook.html

     
  • Mark 2:45 pm on September 20, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Using NVivo: a one day crash course for qualitative researchers, Fri 9th Nov 

    9:30am to 5:30pm, Friday 9th November at the Manchester Digital Laboratory 

    Suitable for complete beginners or those who need a refresher, this intensive one day course will cover all the core functionality of NVivo:

    • An overview of the software
    • Managing and importing your data
    • Coding strategies and techniques
    • Analysing visual and multimedia data
    • Using memos effectively
    • Using annotations and see also links
    • Relationships and modelling
    • Querying your data
    • Managing the complexity of your project

    £50 for PhD Students, £100 for all others

    Press below to go to the booking form:

    Eventbrite - Using NVivo: a one day crash course for qualitative researchers

    All participants will receive an electronic resource pack which covers the material from the course and provides guidance on continuing to develop proficiency with the software. To take part you will need a laptop with NVivo installed. A 30 day free trial of NVivo 10 is available from the QSR website.

    To keep costs down lunch is not included. But the venue is in the heart of Manchester’s famous Northern Quarter and is surrounded by excellent cafes and bars. There will also be LOTS of tea and coffee.

    If you are a wheelchair user and are interested in this training event, please contact me and I’ll try to arrange a session which can accomodate you.

    Mark Carrigan has taught NVivo extensively at the University of Warwick and acted as a NVivo trainer and consultant for the EU FP7 funded MYPLACE project. For more information see his website. Please feel free to get in touch via e-mail or twitter if you have any questions.

     
  • Mark 10:41 am on September 19, 2012 Permalink | Reply
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    Furthering Equality in International HE – a seminar 

    Furthering Equality in International Higher Education: UK and transnational programmes

    Date: 29 Jan 2013
    Time: 10:30am – 3:30pm
    Location/venue: University of Surrey

    This event is being hosted as part of the Higher Education Academy’s Workshop and Seminar Series 2012/2013

    Extant research on processes of internationalisation within higher education has highlighted important inequalities. Students from more privileged homes have been shown to be much more likely than their peers to be internationally mobile; some international students suffer racism and other forms of discrimination; and there are considerable disparities between nations in the income derived from international student mobility and other forms of internationalisation. However, there remain significant gaps in our knowledge. We know relatively little, for example, about the impact on students of transnational programmes, which are offered by UK universities and delivered – at least partially – overseas. Moreover, there has been little work that has compared the impact of different forms of internationalisation. For example, do organised forms of student mobility encourage those who would be unlikely to move abroad under their own initiative (i.e. through spontaneous mobility)? Furthermore, while academic research has been effective in highlighting some of the inequalities which can often be exacerbated by international student mobility, there has been considerably less work on the action that can be taken by policymakers, university leaders and those who teach within higher education institutions to redress these problems.

    This seminar will contribute to our understanding in this area by bringing together researchers, lecturers and staff from university international offices to: (i) compare the issues of (in)equality raised by different types of internationalisation (i.e. spontaneous student mobility, organised student mobility and transnational programmes); and (ii) on the basis of this analysis, consider how all those involved in international higher education can promote greater equality amongst students.

    30 places are available, free of charge, on a first come-first served basis

    Further details and the online booking form can be found at: http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/events/detail/2013/Seminars/Themes/WSSTW02_Surrey

     
  • Mark 11:15 am on September 18, 2012 Permalink | Reply
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    BSA Theory – Early Career Theorists’ Symposium, Apr 2013, London 

    BSA Theory Study Group: Early Career Theorists’ Symposium

    2nd April, 2013, London

    Call for Abstracts

    The Early Career Theorists’ Symposium is a special one-day symposium for up-and-coming theorists, organized by the Theory Study Group of the British Sociological Association. This symposium aims to bring together sociologists at a relatively early stage in their careers who work on theory or are engaged in original theoretical work as part of their ongoing research. We invite early-career sociologists, across all research areas, to submit abstracts. Submissions from advanced PhD students are also welcome.

    Professors Mike Savage, Celia Lury, and John Holmwood will comment on the presentations.

    Complete information for submitting the abstract will consist of:

    (1) name and contact information of the author;

    (2) title of your presentation;

    (3) a 500-word abstract of the presentation;

    (4) three or more keywords descriptive of the presentation.

    To encourage a wide range of submissions, we have not pre-specified a theme for the conference. Instead, papers will be grouped into sessions based on emergent themes.

    Please send submissions to the organizers: Dr Gurminder K Bhambra, University of Warwick (G.K.Bhambra@warwick.ac.uk) and Dr Monika Krause, Goldsmiths College, (m.krause@gold.ac.uk).

    The deadline for submission is 1st November 2012.

    Invitations to present will be extended by 15th November. Please plan to share a full paper by 10th March, 2013. Registration for the event will be free for BSA members or for anyone already registered for the BSA annual conference; there will be a charge of £20 for all other attendees.

    This event is timed to coincide with the BSA annual conference and is a supplement to it in terms of providing a dedicated space for early career theorists to meet and discuss their research. For more information about the BSA annual conference and to also submit an abstract to the main conference, see here: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/bsa-annual-conference.aspx

     
  • Mark 5:27 pm on September 17, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , george galloway,   

    The Greatest Debate of the Decade – Christopher Hitchens vs. George Galloway 

     
  • Mark 4:03 pm on September 17, 2012 Permalink | Reply
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    Call for papers: (Im)personal desires: pornography, sexuality and social networks of desire 

    In the last decade discourses such as celebrity culture, reality TV, social networking and transnational media have shifted the emphasis of online pornography away from a private and clandestine domain towards a self-authenticating and transformative embodiment of self-expression. This special edition of Networking Knowledge aims to address how and why the rhetoric’s and representations of these sexual identities online are now positioned as a central index and catalyst of both straight and gay desires.

    Papers of between 6,000 and 8,000 words are invited from postgraduate students and early career researchers across the humanities and social sciences on identity, sexuality and transgression in gay / straight pornography and sexually explicit representations via online networks of communication. The special issue seeks articles from postgraduate students and early career researchers which critically address how and why bodies, desires and identities online subvert, transgress and de-personalise other forms of sexual representation, and perhaps more pertinently self-representation through processes of assimilation, subversion and self-reflexivity. Possible topics might include, but are not limited to:

    •       The politics of sexually explicit representations online
    •       Rhetorical and/or discursive associated with sexual meanings and practices online
    •       The ‘inter-textual’ nature of social and sexual networks and their relationship to other forms of media representation
    •       The social and/or sexual use of networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Grindr, gaydar, gaydargirls etc.
    •       Sexual identities as either marginalised and/or commodified online
    •       The relationship between production-based and amateur pornography online
    •       Sexual identities and identity construction online / through social and sexual networks of communication
    •       Online sexual desire and its representation through post-modern, post-queer and/or post-capitalist frameworks of meaning.
    •       ‘Personal’ and ‘Impersonal’ modes of communication such as homepages, profiles, blogs, live-cams and/or any other media and their relationship to sexual identity and desire
    •       Performativity, Embodiment and ‘Othering’ in online social and sexual spaces and networks
    •       Subjugation and Subversion in online sexual representation
    •       The relationship between celebrity, reality and sexuality online

    Please send proposals of approximately 250 words and a short biography to G.Longstaff@newcastle.ac.uk by October 19st 2012.

     
  • Mark 3:50 pm on September 17, 2012 Permalink | Reply
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    SPECIAL ISSUE of Gender and Language on Gender, language, communication and the media 

    SPECIAL ISSUE of Gender and Language on  Gender, language, communication and the media

    Gender and Language invite papers on the topic of gender, language, communication and the media for a forthcoming special issue in 2014. We invite papers that deploy various methods (e.g., linguistics, discourse analysis, pragmatics, content analysis, critical discourse analysis, conversation analysis, narrative analysis, and sociolinguistics) to explore the relationship(s) between gender and related topics (e.g. sexism, sexuality, sexualisation, post-feminism) and the media as broadly conceived (e.g. newspapers, television, radio, online environments).

    Over recent years, issues to do with sex  and gender  have become increasingly visible across various forms of contemporary media. But how are we to understand the varied ways in which such phenomena are unpacked, reformulated, constructed, deleted, and so on, in and through these media? This special issue aims to pull together a diverse range of papers that all coalesce around the following sorts of questions:

    1.      How are contemporary media representations, stereotypes and accounts of gender constructed in the media?
    2.      What, if anything, is new, unique and distinct about the ways in which gender is constructed in and through such media representations?
    3.      How is it possible, methodologically, to capture something like gender, and how can we know when we have found it?

    Please send a 750 word summary of your proposed paper, detailing *provisional* title, topic, methods, and findings. We will let you know at this outline stage whether or not your paper looks to be a good fit for the special issue. Authors of papers that fit with the issue’s aims will then be invited to submit a full length paper of between 5000-7000 words (including abstract, data and references). Papers will be subject to the usual peer review process.

    In the event that we end up with more accepted papers than the special issue allows space for, papers may be accepted for future issues of Gender and Language.

    The deadline for submitting 750 word summaries is November 30th 2012. Please submit your summary to the special issue editor, Dr Frederick Attenborough (f.t.attenborough@lboro.ac.uk).

    The deadline for full length papers is May 15th 2013.

     
  • Mark 2:44 pm on September 17, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , QSR, ,   

    Using NVivo: a one day crash course for qualitative researchers, Fri 9th Nov 

    9:30am to 5:30pm, Friday 9th November at the Manchester Digital Laboratory 

    Suitable for complete beginners or those who need a refresher, this intensive one day course will cover all the core functionality of NVivo:

    • An overview of the software
    • Managing and importing your data
    • Coding strategies and techniques
    • Analysing visual and multimedia data
    • Using memos effectively
    • Using annotations and see also links
    • Relationships and modelling
    • Querying your data
    • Managing the complexity of your project

    £50 for PhD Students, £100 for all others

    Press below to go to the booking form:

    Eventbrite - Using NVivo: a one day crash course for qualitative researchers

    All participants will receive an electronic resource pack which covers the material from the course and provides guidance on continuing to develop proficiency with the software. To take part you will need a laptop with NVivo installed. A 30 day free trial of NVivo 10 is available from the QSR website.

    To keep costs down lunch is not included. But the venue is in the heart of Manchester’s famous Northern Quarter and is surrounded by excellent cafes and bars. There will also be LOTS of tea and coffee.

    If you are a wheelchair user and are interested in this training event, please contact me and I’ll try to arrange a session which can accomodate you.

    Mark Carrigan has taught NVivo extensively at the University of Warwick and acted as a NVivo trainer and consultant for the EU FP7 funded MYPLACE project. For more information see his website. Please feel free to get in touch via e-mail or twitter if you have any questions.

     
  • Mark 8:57 pm on September 16, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    By far the best explanation of cultural realism I have ever encountered 

    You can think of culturally decodable information as a potential form of experience, very much as you can think of a brick resting on a ledge as storing potential energy. When the brick is prodded to fall, the energy is revealed. That is only possible because it was lifted into place at some point in the past. In the same way, stored information might cause experience to be revealed if it is prodded in the right way.

    Jaron Lanier, You Are Not A Gadget, Pg 28

     
  • Mark 4:45 pm on September 14, 2012 Permalink | Reply
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    SOLIDARITY BUT NOT SIMILARITY? LGBT COMMUNITIES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY 

    SOLIDARITY BUT NOT SIMILARITY?

    LGBT COMMUNITIES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

    Free one day conference, 9th November 2012, Sheffield

    This conference will disseminate findings from the recent UK Arts and Humanities Research Council project on understandings and experiences of ‘LGBT communities’, and their implications for ‘wellbeing’. It will also feature additional contributions from experts in the field (see below).

    The event is aimed at a wide variety of people, including academics, policymakers and service commissioners, practitioners and service providers, project participants, postgraduate researchers/students, and anyone else who’s interested!

    Confirmed contributions so far include:

    • Professor Catherine Donovan, University of Sunderland
    • Eleanor Formby, Sheffield Hallam University
    • Lee Gale, TransBareAll
    • Steve Slack, Centre for HIV and Sexual Health
    • Youth group drama performance, Sheena Amos Youth Trust

    To register for a place please complete the booking form and return to: e.formby@shu.ac.uk.

    There are a very small number of travel bursaries available for those on a low income. If you would like to apply for this please provide details on the booking form.

    http://www.lgbtcommunityresearch.co.uk

     
  • Mark 9:10 pm on September 13, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , edward,   

    An early review of the Sociological Imagination (“Imagine a burly cowpuncher on the long, slow ride from the Panhandle of Texas to Columbia University”) 

    Imagine a burly cowpuncher on the long, slow ride from the Panhandle of Texas to Columbia University, carrying in his saddle-bag some books which he reads with absorption while his horse trots along. Imagine that among the books are some novels of Kafka, Trotsky’s History of the Russian Revolution, and essays of Max Weber. Imagine the style and imagery that would result from the interaction of the cowboy- student and his studies. Imagine also that en route he passes through Madison, Wisconsin, that seat of a decaying populism and that, on arriving at his destination in New York, he encounters Madison Avenue, that street full of reeking phantasies of the manipulation of the human will and of what is painful to America’s well-wishers and enjoyable to its detractors. Imagine the first Madison disclosing to the learned cowpuncher his subsequent political mode, the second an object of his hatred…The end result of such an imaginary grand tour would be a work like The Sociological Imagination

    By Edward Shils. The fact I’m only dimly aware of who he is makes me chuckle on behalf of C. Wright Mills.

     
  • Mark 8:06 pm on September 13, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Interview: Les Back on the 2011 riots in the UK 

     
  • Mark 1:22 pm on September 13, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    BSA Presidential Event: ‘Understanding the financial crisis: sociology, political economy and heterodox economics’ 

    BSA Presidential Event, together with FESSUD and the British Library:

    ‘Understanding the financial crisis: sociology, political economy and heterodox economics’

    The event will take place at the British Library Conference Centre, London on Monday 8h October 2012 between 10am – 4.10pm

    Speakers include: Andrew Brown (Leeds University Business School), Mathew Bond (London South Bank University), Julie Froud (Manchester Business School), Juan Pablo Pardo-Guerra (LSE) , Malcolm Sawyer (Leeds University Business School), David Spencer (Leeds University Business School) , Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths University of London),  Zsuzsanna Vargha (LSE)

    The financial crisis of 2008 has been longstanding in its consequences and seemingly intractable in its resolution. It is widely understood to have arisen from the de-regulation of financial institutions and the emergence of increasingly complex financial instruments as well as a culture of risk associated with high rewards. The crisis took the discipline of economics by surprise leading to the Queen’s question of why there had been a failure to predict it. One response from a seminar organised by the British Academy concluded that it was “principally a failure of the collective imagination of many bright people, both in this country and internationally, to understand the risks to the system as a whole” (http://media.ft.com/cms/3e3b6ca8-7a08-11de-b86f-00144feabdc0.pdf). The present seminar is an exercise in alternative imaginations, both in accounting for the crisis and in providing alternatives.

    Further information and booking at: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/bsa-presidential-event.aspx)

    Direct link to online at: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/event/eventBooking.aspx?id=EVT10239).

     
  • Mark 11:45 am on September 13, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Gender Sex & Power: Interdisciplinary Dialogues 

    Gender Sex & Power: Interdisciplinary Dialogues

    University of Hull Postgraduate Conference

    Wednesday 21st November 2012

    Call for Papers:
    This one-day interdisciplinary conference draws together postgraduate & early career scholars to explore the intersections of gender, sex and power through their research.

    Registration Details:

    There is a £5 registration fee to secure attendance which is inclusive of refreshments, buffet lunch and wine reception.

    For further information, to submit a 250 word abstract & to receive a registration form, please email Dr Suzanne Clisby, University of Hull at: s.m.clisby@hull.ac.uk.

    **Deadline for registration and submission of abstracts: Monday 15th October 2012**

     
  • Mark 4:36 pm on September 12, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Equalities: Surviving Austerity – Free workshop 

    2.00-5.00 pm, 6 November 2012, NCVO conference suite, Camden, London

    This workshop will provide a forum for stakeholders, community activists, and service users to discuss current developments in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) equalities field. It will include presentations by key community organisations and it will introduce the recently published book Sexuality, Equality and Diversity(Diane Richardson and Surya Monro, Palgrave MacMillan 2012). The workshop is free to attend and is funded by the ESRC as part of the Festival of Social Sciences.

    Confirmed Speakers:

    • Alice Ashworth (Stonewall)
    • Petra Davis (Bi.UK)
    • Louis Bailey (Transgender Resource and Empowerment Centre – TREC)
    • Professor Diane Richardson
    • Dr Surya Monro

    For more details and to register please go to http://research.ncl.ac.uk/selg/. Registration will be on a first come first served basis.

    For enquiries please email lgbt@hud.ac.uk

     
  • Mark 4:33 pm on September 12, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Psyche in the habitus? Last chance to book! 

    Psyche in the Habitus? 

    Thursday, 27 September 2012, 10am-4.15pm 

    Birkbeck, University of London, Birkbeck Main building,

    Room 414, Malet Street, London WC1

    Travel details at: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/maps

    £15.00 BSA members/£10.00 Post-grad BSA members

    £18.00 Non-BSA/£12.00 non-BSA post-grads 

    BOOK NOW at: the BSA Sociology, Psychoanalysis and the Psychosocial Study Group webpage or follow the links from the BSA website (http://www.britsoc.co.uk/ ).

     Organizer: Elizabeth Silva

    The workshop aims to explore Pierre Bourdieu’s proposition in Pascalian Meditations that sociology and psychology should combine their efforts to analyse the genesis of investment in a field of social relations – like the domestic space – where a complex process of socialization is initiated. In what ways can the psyche in the habitus be manifested and captured? How do sociological tools and psychoanalytical ones enable researchers to identify the workings of the habitus?

    Speakers:  Helene Aarseth (University of Oslo); Lynne Layton (Harvard Medical School);Harriet Nielsen (University of Oslo); Steve Pile (Open University); Diane Reay (Cambridge University); Elizabeth Silva (Open University).

    Sponsored by The Open University, Centre for Citizenship, Identity and Governance (CCIG), Psychosocial Research Programme and the Birkbeck Institute for Social Research

     
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