Dear all,

The 16th Conference on Computer-Assisted Analysis of Qualitative Data (CAQD) will be held in Berlin from March 6 to 7, 2014 consisting of two keynote addresses, workshops, and a poster session.

KEYNOTES:

– New Horizions for Mixed Methods Analysis, Prof. Dr. Udo Kuckartz, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Germany
– Using QDA software in the context of field work, Clarence C. Gravlee, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida

WORKSHOPS:

We still have available places for MAXQDA workshops including, among others:
– MAXQDA starter courses (in English and Spanish)
– MAXQDA for advanced users
– Systematic reviews with MAXQDA
– Qualitative text analysis
– Mixing methods and data types for analysing open-ended questions
– Audio and video analysis and mobile field research with MAXApp
A comprehensive list of workshops is available at www.caqd.de/workshops-e

POSTER SESSION:

The conference will also feature a poster session on Thursday, March 6 for which we accept proposals of posters on computer-assisted analysis of qualitative data and the use of MAXQDA within the context of a research project.
The focus of the poster should be on presenting how your analysis relates to your use of the software for analyzing qualitative data. You will find possible topics for your poster atwww.caqd.de/cfp-e

Proposals should be sent to cfp@caqd.de no later than January 31, 2014. We will inform you until February 9, 2014 whether your poster has been accepted.

The 16th Conference on Computer-Assisted Analysis of Qualitative Data (CAQD) will be held in Berlin from March 6 to 7, 2014. You will find all relevant details on the registration and the academic program at www.caqd.de/start
The conference offers a combination of workshops, methods discussions and reports from research practice.

CAQD will feature a total of 17 workshops including, among others:
# MAXQDA starter courses (in English and Spanish)
# MAXQDA for advanced users
# Systematic reviews with MAXQDA
# Qualitative text analysis
# Mixing methods and data types for analysing open-ended questions
# Audio and video analysis and mobile field research with MAXApp
A comprehensive list of workshops is available at www.caqd.de/workshops-e

The conference will also feature a poster session on Thursday, March 6 for which we accept proposals of posters on computer-assisted analysis of qualitative data and the use of MAXQDA within the context of a research project.

The focus of the poster should be on presenting how your analysis relates to your use of the software for analyzing qualitative data.

Possible topics for your poster might include:

# Implementation of specific research steps/methodologies using MAXQDA
# Connecting, integrating and exchanging data between different (analysis) programs (such as mind mapping tools, reference management tools, statistical software)
# Approaches to visualization and specific examples of visuals
# Use of analytical software in research groups (teamwork process, issues, etc.)
# Quantification of the research process
# Dealing with specific document types (e.g. very long, very short, many, very different, etc.)

Proposals should be sent to cfp@caqd.de no later than January 31, 2014. You will find all relevant details on the submission at www.caqd.de/cfp-e. We will inform you until February 9, 2014whether your poster has been accepted.Please do not hesitate to contact us, in case you have any further questions!

Kelle (1997) sounds a useful note of caution in an insightful discussion of the history of CAQDAS software:

 The newly developed software programs for computer-aided textual analysis became tools for data storage and retrieval rather than tools for ‘data analysis’. Nevertheless, terms used quite frequently in the ongoing debate like ‘computer- aided qualitative data analysis’ or ‘software program for theory building’ carry implicit connotations of computer programs as tools for the analysis of textual data which could be compared to software packages that perform statistical analyses.

While the boundary between data retrieval and data analysis has blurred somewhat as subsequent generations of CAQDAS software have become ever more sophisticated, it is helpful to recognise the important distinction between organising and analysing data at the outset. As with most software packages, many researchers only use a small selection of the tools offered within NVivo and many use it solely for the former function of organising the data which accumulates within any qualitative research project. On this level the software can be extremely useful: it is simply quicker, easier and cheaper to organise and manage large collections of qualitative sources using specialist software than is the case with any analogue alternative (Welsh 2002).

In the same way that a word- processing package does not dictate whether you write a novel or a sermon, QSR software does not determine nor constitute a method despite some

literature that links the software to grounded theory. (Crowley, Harré and Tagg 2002: 195)

This is an important point though one which does risk overstatement. Using NVivo can predispose researchers towards certain techniques or approaches to analysis but, if and when this happens, it is a consequence of how the software is being used rather the software itself. As noted earlier, many researchers only use a small fraction of the functionality offered by the software. There is nothing ‘wrong’ with doing this. Indeed it would be difficult to understand what such a statement would mean, though a vague sense that one is using the tool in the ‘wrong’ way can be a common experience involved in working with complex software packages, particularly when getting started. It is helpful to confront this at the outset and proceed from an understanding of what the software can do and what use you want to make of these functions. Reflecting in the way helps us avoid what is a surprisingly common misconception about the role such software plays in research practice:

The misconception that the software does something (a notion of some automated process of analysis) is not uncommon. The question of who is in charge, the software or the researcher, is tellingly reflected in enquiries such as ‘Will it let me. . . ?’ It is sometimes forgotten by those new to qualitative software that any lack in its ability to do something in particular certainly does not preclude them from including such strategies in their research. It is always possible to leave the software to one side and use other means as well—to get out of the car and perhaps walk, cycle or a take a boat for parts of the journey, as it were. It must be emphasized that, although the limitations it imposes continue to decrease, the researcher is not a hostage to qualitative software (Crowley, Harré and Tagg 2002: 195)

One of the most important things to remember about NVivo is that it is a collection of tools. While it might be difficult to make an informed decision about which of these to apply without some prior knowledge of the software, it is nonetheless a choice to be made by yourself and/or your research team. In my experience, it often doesn’t occur to people that NVivo can be used in some entirely mundane ways tied to the practical demands of the project you’re working on e.g. using a node or collection of nodes to collate material intended for a particular journal article you will be working on.

References

Crowley, C., Harré, R., & Tagg, C. (2002). Qualitative research and computing: methodological issues and practices in using QSR NVivo and NUD* IST.International journal of social research methodology5(3), 193-197

Kelle, U. (2004). Computer-assisted qualitative data analysis. Qualitative research practice, 473-489.

Welsh, E. (2002, May). Dealing with data: Using NVivo in the qualitative data analysis process. In Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung/Forum: Qualitative Social Research (Vol. 3, No. 2).

 

Friday, 30 November 2012 from 09:30 to 18:00 (PST)
Manchester Digital Laboratory, Manchester, United Kingdom

Suitable for complete beginners or those who need a refresher, this intensive one day course will cover all the core functionality of NVivo:

  • An overview of the software
  • Managing and importing your data
  • Coding strategies and techniques
  • Analysing visual and multimedia data
  • Using memos effectively
  • Using annotations and see also links
  • Relationships and models
  • Querying your data
  • Managing the complexity of your project

Eventbrite - Using NVivo: a one day crash course for qualitative researchers

All participants will receive an electronic resource pack which covers the material from the course and provides guidance on continuing to develop proficiency with the software. To take part you will need a laptop with NVivo installed. A 30 day free trial of NVivo 10 is available from the QSR website.

To keep costs down lunch is not included. But the venue is in the heart of Manchester’s famous Northern Quarter and is surrounded by excellent cafes and bars. There will also be LOTS of tea and coffee.

If you are a wheelchair user and are interested in this training event, please contact me and I’ll try to arrange a session which can accomodate you.

Mark Carrigan has taught NVivo extensively at the University of Warwick and acted as a NVivo trainer and consultant for the EU FP7 funded MYPLACE project. For more information see his website. Testimonials are available online here. Please feel free to get in touch via e-mail or twitter if you have any questions.

9:30am to 5:30pm, Friday 9th November at the Manchester Digital Laboratory 

Suitable for complete beginners or those who need a refresher, this intensive one day course will cover all the core functionality of NVivo:

  • An overview of the software
  • Managing and importing your data
  • Coding strategies and techniques
  • Analysing visual and multimedia data
  • Using memos effectively
  • Using annotations and see also links
  • Relationships and modelling
  • Querying your data
  • Managing the complexity of your project

£50 for PhD Students, £100 for all others

Press below to go to the booking form:

Eventbrite - Using NVivo: a one day crash course for qualitative researchers

All participants will receive an electronic resource pack which covers the material from the course and provides guidance on continuing to develop proficiency with the software. To take part you will need a laptop with NVivo installed. A 30 day free trial of NVivo 10 is available from the QSR website.

To keep costs down lunch is not included. But the venue is in the heart of Manchester’s famous Northern Quarter and is surrounded by excellent cafes and bars. There will also be LOTS of tea and coffee.

If you are a wheelchair user and are interested in this training event, please contact me and I’ll try to arrange a session which can accomodate you.

Mark Carrigan has taught NVivo extensively at the University of Warwick and acted as a NVivo trainer and consultant for the EU FP7 funded MYPLACE project. For more information see his website. Please feel free to get in touch via e-mail or twitter if you have any questions.