From her wonderful novel Over Heads, pg 13:

Like most academic men, he regarded equal opportunities and gender as something of a turn-off. But one wasn’t supposed to say so. Gone were the days when one could happily ridicule women for being interested in themselves, confident of not getting the rejoinder that in a patriarchal world that’s only what men have been for aeons. No, now you had to pretend to be on their side. Of course, on another level, there was a considerable incentive to do this, because you wanted women to like you. The psychology of it was odd, because fi you liked them and they liked you, then you couldn’t help but see they had a point in going on about gender.

Thanks to Roger Burrows for the recommendation. One of a number of books I’ve started reading after his keynote at the Accelerated Academy.

I’m looking forward to this event on Friday. It’s been ages since I’ve talked about a/sexuality!

Sexuality and Gender Conference & Official Launch of the Palgrave Handbook of the Psychology of Sexuality and Gender

The Open University Camden, 1-11 Hawley Crescent, Camden Town, London NW1 8NP

Map here

Friday November 27th 2015 9.30am until 7pm

The authors and editors of the Palgrave Handbook of the Psychology of Sexuality and Gender welcome you to the conference and official book launch. Each author will speak for twenty minutes on the cutting edge research and theory contained within their chapter, followed by ten minutes for questions from the audience.

Lunch is not provided, however local shops and supermarkets will be able to provide almost anything you would like.

Attendance is free, but registration beforehand via Christina Richards (contact@christinarichards.co.uk) is required. Do book early as space is limited and the editors’ last conference and book launch was over-subscribed.

An initiative from the Centre for Women and Gender in Sociology at Warwick, where the centre for social ontology is also based:

A reminder that we are now accepting submissions to the CSWG blog. This academic focussed blog aims to promote the work of academics and students conducting research around topics relating to women and gender studies.

We warmly welcome submissions from scholars working in, but not limited to, the following:

Reflections on issues relating to the production of feminist research, including feminist theory and methodologies;

Academics forging links with relevant contemporary activism;

Issues from any discipline relating to a broad range of gender related topics, such as gender and education, politics, transgender and sexualities, feminism and women’s rights, masculinities and femininities, media and culture, and work, employment and the family.

Submission guidelines:

Anyone can contribute; we welcome, and actively encourage, a variety of voices.

Though the focus of the blog remains primarily academic in nature, we are happy to accept a range of content from opinion pieces to short essays. Please note the maximum word limit of 1000 words.

Please include references so that readers have the opportunity to carry out further reading.

Please include a brief biography – no more than a few lines – with all submissions. Although we would prefer to avoid anonymity in order to promote transparency, we appreciate there may be instances where this would not be appropriate.

Please email submissions to cswgseminarseries@gmail.com for peer review. If you have any further questions, please do email us at cswgseminarseries@gmail.com or get in touch via Facebook or Twitter

With best wishes,

CSWG graduate seminar committee: Elizabeth Ablett, Emine Erdogan, Heather Griffiths, Iro Konstantinou, Kate Mahoney, Isabel Nuñez-Salazar and Carli Rowell

From The Boy Kings, by Katherine Losse, pg 134:

That Sunday, after I’d slept off our long night, I logged in to Facebook to see an endless stream of videos that the boys had filmed at the club. In them, the boys were not chatting up or kissing girls they had met, as I had expected. Instead, they were performing an elaborate ritual only they would have the strange, cold vanity to invent, in which they would methodically chat up and reject girls that the bouncers had brought to their table. “Leave! You’re not pretty enough!” one of them seemed to say over the din of the club as he shooed the girls away in succession like so many servants. Even though I had been living in this boys’ world for almost two years, I was still a bit shocked. Their products ultimately reflected their real- life behavior. Instead of making a technology of understanding, we seemed sometimes to be making a technology of the opposite: pure, dehumanizing objectification. We were optimizing ways to judge and use and dispose of people, without having to consider their feelings, or that they had feelings at all.

The intruiging suggestion made by Losse is that these tech bros represent an epochal transformation in American alpha masculinity. She doesn’t really follow it up but I’m completely persuaded that tech bros, as well as bro culture in general, represent something of profound sociological significance.

From The Boy Kings, by Katherine Losse, pg 25:

For example, on Mark’s birthday, in May 2006, I received an email from his administrative assistant telling me that it would be my job that day, along with all the other women in the office, to wear a T- shirt with Mark’s picture on it. Wait, what? I thought, he’s not my god or my president; I just work here . The men in the office were told that they would be wearing Adidas sandals that day, also in homage to Mark. The gender coding was clear: women were to declare allegiance to Mark, and men were to become Mark, or to at least dress like him. I decided that this was more than I could stomach and stayed home to play sick that day. I was the only one. The other women in the office, including Mark’s girlfriend, who did not work at Facebook, but had come to the office to celebrate his birthday, happily posed for pictures wearing identical shirts printed with Mark’s picture, like teenage girls at an *NSYNC concert or more disturbingly, like so many polygamous wives in a cult.

Gawker apparently posted photos of this at the time but I’m struggling to find them.

This looks like a great special issue of tripleC. I’m going to get started on it as soon as I finish this special issue of The Sociological Review on Gender & Creative Labour. I did an interview with the editors of this issue & it left me aware that I’m even more interested in these questions than I thought I was previously.

Interrogating Internships: Unpaid Work, Creative Industries, and Higher Education
Special issue of tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique
Edited by Greig de Peuter, Nicole S. Cohen, Enda Brophy
Vol. 13 (2): pp. 329-602
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/issue/view/32

We are thrilled to announce the publication of “Interrogating Internships: Unpaid Work, Creative Industries, and Higher Education,” a special issue of the journal /tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique/. The issue features 22 articles, 32 contributors, and a mix of academic and activist accounts.

The issue’s publication was preceded by a public forum in Toronto, “Interns, Connect! A Forum on Upsetting Unpaid Work”
http://culturalworkersorganize.org/interns-connect/
A launch event in Vancouver is in the works. As an open-access journal, all of the articles are freely available.

The table of contents is available here:
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/issue/current
The complete issue can be downloaded from here:
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/719

The social ontology of trolling paper I’ve been pondering recently probably wouldn’t work for this but I plan to attend nonetheless:

Scold’s to Trolls; Social and Legal Responses to Visible and Audible Women

A one-day symposium: September 15th 2015

Organised by the Centre for Law and Society at Lancaster University Law School

Keynote Speaker: Professor Feona Attwood, Professor of Cultural Studies, Communication and Media, Middlesex University, UK

Theme

Underlying the trolling of visible and audible women is the deeply entrenched misogynistic idea of silencing women. Trolling is arguably just the latest methodology used to keep women silenced. The process of silencing women has been on-going for centuries. In the middle ages, women were silenced by various methods one of which was the scolds bridle; a cast iron cage fitted over a woman’s head and which included a metal plate with spikes on that was inserted into her mouth. The intention and the effect were not only to silence that particular woman, but also to have a disciplinary effect on other women. The trolling of women such as Emma Watson; Mary Beard; Caroline Criado-Perez and Stella Creasy, raise questions about whether the trolling of audible and visible women is a modern equivalent of the scolds bridle. When looking at the effects these mechanisms produce, it is difficult to see the difference between the 15th century and the 21st century. Whilst men can indeed be trolled, the significant difference in their experience is that they are not trolled because of their sex or gender.  The silencing of women and issues related to women straddles all areas of life from bank notes; video games and the high street (e.g. River Island’s ‘Anti Nag Gag’); or politics (e.g. Michael Fabricant’s tweet that he would like to ‘throat-punch’ a female journalist).

Submission are welcomed from a broad range of disciplines including law, criminology, media, sociology, cultural studies, history, social sciences, economics, psychology, linguistics and gender studies; from academics and non-academics whose work is relevant to the symposium theme, or which is of a multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary nature.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION

Please submit an abstract of max. 300 words and 5-7 keywords (indicating the main research area in particular), and a short biographical note (approx. 2-3 lines) to s.beresford@lancaster.ac.uk or m.butler1@lancaster.ac.uk or s.weare@lancaster.ac.uk. Please include in your subject line ‘Abstract submission’.

The deadline for submitting abstracts is 1st May 2015.  A draft programme will be announced as soon as possible after the abstract submission deadline (and no later than 19th May 2015), together with registration details.

Call for Papers (http://www.maneyonline.com/pb/assets/raw/PRT/REA_special_issue_gender.pdf)

Critical Realism, Gender and Feminism
Special Issue of the Journal of Critical Realism (15:5, 2016)
Edited by Angela Martínez Dy, Lena Gunnarsson and Michiel van Ingen
Email: lena.gunnarsson@oru.se<mailto:lena.gunnarsson@oru.se>

An increasing number of gender scholars have become familiar with critical realism, finding it a robust alternative to the poststructuralist perspectives that currently dominate gender studies and feminism. This trend has coincided with an increased interest among feminist theorists in the issues of ontology, materiality and nature, which have always been at the heart of critical realist interventions. However, despite these thematic alignments, and despite the fact that both critical realism and feminist theory are inherently critical-emancipatory, the critical realist approach continues to occupy a marginal role within both feminist and gender studies debates. Concurrently, the field of critical realism is decidedly ‘masculine’ in nature, both in the sense that men dominate the field, and in terms of the issues with which critical realists have most commonly concerned themselves. Recent critical realist feminist work, the International Association of Critical Realism’s adoption of a proactive policy to enhance the representation of women in its organs and activities, and the growing critical realist preoccupation (particularly in Bhaskar’s philosophy of metaReality) with historically ‘feminine’ topics such as love, mark a potential shift away from these unfortunate trends.
In order to encourage the development of this emerging field of critical realist feminism and gender studies, as well as critical exchanges between the respective branches of critical realism (including dialectical critical realism and metaRealism) and feminist theory/gender studies, we are happy to invite submissions for a special issue of Journal of Critical Realism on Critical Realism, Gender and Feminism. We welcome not only contributions that draw on critical realism in studying gender relations and/or engaging with feminist concerns but also critiques of critical realism from feminist or gender-based points of view.
Topics of interest include, but are by no means limited to, the following:

•      Critical realism and poststructuralist feminism/gender studies

•      Critical realism and socialist/eco/radical/black/postcolonial feminism

•      Critical realism and the ontological/materialist/naturalistic turn in feminist theory

•      Critical realism and intersectionality

•      Critical realism, metaRealism, love and gender

•      Critiques/auto-critiques of existing critical realist work from a feminist/gender studies perspective

•      Feminist epistemology, standpoint theory and critical realism

•      Critical realism and feminist critiques of (social) science

•      Examinations/critiques of feminist taboos on realism, nature and causality

•      Critical realism and post-feminist culture

•      Critical realism, dialectics and feminist deconstruction

•      Revitalizing the explanatory feminist tradition: what is patriarchy?

•      Critical realism and sexuality

•      Critical realism and queer studies

•      Critical realism and men/masculinity studies

•      Critical realism, sex and gender identity

•      Critical realism and gendered/sexual violence

•      Critical realism, feminism, gender studies and war/conflict

•      Critical realism and feminist ethics

•      Critical realism and pornography

•      Critical realism and feminist methods/methodology

•      Agency, gender and critical realism

•      Critical realism and feminist activism/politics

•      Feminism, gender studies, critical realism and other realisms (Barad’s agential realism, post-positivist realism etc.)

•      Critical realism as underlabourer for applied work in feminism/gender studies

•      Critical realism, interdisciplinarity, gender and feminism

•      Feminist spirituality and metaRealism

•      Critical realism and feminist economics

Instructions for authors
Papers should be no more than 8,000 words (not inclusive of references). In all other respects, our instructions for authors apply. Please consult these at www.maneyonline.com/ifa/rea<http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/rea> or use one of our recently published articles as a guide in setting out your work. Articles (as distinct from pieces for our Perspective and Debate sections) will be subject to external peer review.
Submissions need not be exclusively concerned with critical realism or its critique, but should relate their arguments in some significant way to critical realism. For instance, the main focus of an article could be Karen Barad’s feminist appropriation of Bohr’s agential realism, but it should include consideration of critical realism.

Important dates
October 1, 2015: deadline for first drafts
February 26, 2016: reviewers’ reports and editors’ decision provided
May 23, 2016: deadline for final drafts
June 30, 2016: final copy due with the publisher
October 2016: publication of the special issue online and print

Enquiries and submissions
Please send any enquiries to lena.gunnarsson@oru.se<mailto:lena.gunnarsson@oru.se> Please upload articles for peer review to our online system, http://www.editorialmanager.com/rea/default.asp. When uploading you will be asked if your paper is for a themed issue. Please answer ‘Yes, the special issue on Critical Realism, Gender and Feminism’. If your paper is accepted but not included in the special issue, it will appear in a subsequent issue. Please send any other material for the special issue to lena.gunnarsson@oru.se<mailto:lena.gunnarsson@oru.se>.

About the Journal
Journal of Critical Realism is the journal of the International Association for Critical Realism (IACR), established in 1997 to foster the discussion, propagation and development of critical realist approaches to understanding and changing the world. It provides a forum for scholars wishing to promote realist emancipatory philosophy, social theory and science on an interdisciplinary and international b

I recently started reading the Ian Fleming novels for the first time. While I expected some unpleasant sentiments in them, I’ve been surprised by quite how vitriolic Bond’s misogyny is:

And then there was this pest of a girl. He sighed. Women were for recreation. On a job, they got in the way and fogged things up with sex and hurt feelings and all the emotional baggage they carried around. One had to look out for them and take care of them.

‘Bitch,’ said Bond, and then remembering the Muntes, he said ‘bitch’ again more loudly and walked out of the room.

Casino Royale, Pg 32

This was just what he had been afraid of. These blithering women who thought they could do a man’s work. Why the hell couldn’t they stay at home and mind their pots and pans and stick to their frocks and gossip and leave men’s work to the men. And now for this to happen to him, just when the job had come off so beautifully. For vesper to fall for an old trick like that and get herself snatched and probably held to ranson like some bloody heroine in a strip cartoon. The silly bitch. […]

The idea was a straight swap. The girl against his cheque for forty million. Well, he wouldn’t play: wouldn’t think of playing. She was in the Service and knew what she was up against. He wouldn’t even ask M. This job was more important than her. It was just too bad. She was a fine girl, but he wasn’t going to fall for this childish trick. No dice. He would try and catch the Citroen and shoot it out with them and if she got shot in the process, that was too bad. He would have done his stuff – tried to rescue her before they got her off to some hideout – but if he didn’t catch up with them he would get back to his hotel and go to sleep and say no more about it. The next morning he would ask Mathis what had happened to her and show him the note. If Le Chiffre put the touch on Bond for the money in exchange for the girl, Bond would do nothing and tell no one. The girl would just have to take it. If the commissionaire came along with the story of what he had seen, Bond would bluff it out by saying he had had a drunken row with the girl.

Casino Royale Pg. 116-117

Through the red mist of pain, Bond thought of Vesper. He could imagine how she was being used by the two gunmen. They would be making the most of her before she was sent for by Le Chiffre. He thought of the fat wet lips of the Corsican and the slow cruelty of the thin man. Poor wretch to have been dragged into this. Poor little beast.

Casino Royale, Pg 137

I’m not sure what I’d write but I’d really like to contribute to this:

Critical Realism, Gender and Feminism

Special Issue of the Journal of Critical Realism (15:5, 2016)

Edited by Angela Martínez Dy, Lena Gunnarsson and Michiel van Ingen

Email: lena.gunnarsson@oru.se

An increasing number of gender scholars have become familiar with critical realism, finding it a robust alternative to the poststructuralist perspectives that currently dominate gender studies and feminism. This trend has coincided with an increased interest among feminist theorists in the issues of ontology, materiality and nature, which have always been at the heart of critical realist interventions. However, despite these thematic alignments, and despite the fact that both critical realism and feminist theory are inherently critical-emancipatory, the critical realist approach continues to occupy a marginal role within both feminist and gender studies debates. Concurrently, the field of critical realism is decidedly ‘masculine’ in nature, both in the sense that men dominate the field, and in terms of the issues with which critical realists have most commonly concerned themselves. Recent critical realist feminist work, the International Association of Critical Realism’s adoption of a proactive policy to enhance the representation of women in its organs and activities, and the growing critical realist preoccupation (particularly in Bhaskar’s philosophy of metaReality) with historically ‘feminine’ topics such as love, mark a potential shift away from these unfortunate trends.

In order to encourage the development of this emerging field of critical realist feminism and gender studies, as well as critical exchanges between the respective branches of critical realism (including dialectical critical realism and metaRealism) and feminist theory/gender studies, we are happy to invite submissions for a special issue ofJournal of Critical Realism on Critical Realism, Gender and Feminism. We welcome not only contributions that draw on critical realism in studying gender relations and/or engaging with feminist concerns but also critiques of critical realism from feminist or gender-based points of view.

Topics of interest include, but are by no means limited to, the following:

  • Critical realism and poststructuralist feminism/gender studies
  • Critical realism and socialist/eco/radical/black/postcolonial feminism
  • Critical realism and the ontological/materialist/naturalistic turn in feminist theory
  • Critical realism and intersectionality
  • Critical realism, metaRealism, love and gender
  • Critiques/auto-critiques of existing critical realist work from a feminist/gender studies perspective
  • Feminist epistemology, standpoint theory and critical realism
  • Critical realism and feminist critiques of (social) science
  • Examinations/critiques of feminist taboos on realism, nature and causality
  • Critical realism and post-feminist culture
  • Critical realism, dialectics and feminist deconstruction
  • Revitalizing the explanatory feminist tradition: what is patriarchy?
  • Critical realism and sexuality
  • Critical realism and queer studies
  • Critical realism and men/masculinity studies
  • Critical realism, sex and gender identity
  • Critical realism and gendered/sexual violence
  • Critical realism, feminism, gender studies and war/conflict
  • Critical realism and feminist ethics
  • Critical realism and pornography
  • Critical realism and feminist methods/methodology
  • Agency, gender and critical realism
  • Critical realism and feminist activism/politics
  • Feminism, gender studies, critical realism and other realisms (Barad’s agential realism, post-positivist realism etc.)
  • Critical realism as underlabourer for applied work in feminism/gender studies
  • Critical realism, interdisciplinarity, gender and feminism
  • Feminist spirituality and metaRealism
  • Critical realism and feminist economics

Instructions for authors

Papers should be no more than 8,000 words (not inclusive of references). In all other respects, our instructions for authors apply. Please consult these at www.maneyonline.com/ifa/rea or use one of our recently published articles as a guide in setting out your work. Articles (as distinct from pieces for our Perspective and Debate sections) will be subject to external peer review.

Submissions need not be exclusively concerned with critical realism or its critique, but should relate their arguments in some significant way to critical realism. For instance, the main focus of an article could be Karen Barad’s feminist appropriation of Bohr’s agential realism, but it should include consideration of critical realism.

Important dates

October 1, 2015: deadline for first drafts

February 26, 2016: reviewers’ reports and editors’ decision provided

May 23, 2016: deadline for final drafts

June 30, 2016: final copy due with the publisher

October 2016: publication of the special issue online and print

Enquiries and submissions

Please send any enquiries to lena.gunnarsson@oru.se Please upload articles for peer review to our online system, http://www.editorialmanager.com/rea/default.asp. When uploading you will be asked if your paper is for a themed issue. Please answer ‘Yes, the special issue on Critical Realism, Gender and Feminism’. If your paper is accepted but not included in the special issue, it will appear in a subsequent issue. Please send any other material for the special issue to lena.gunnarsson@oru.se.

About the Journal

Journal of Critical Realism is the journal of the International Association for Critical Realism (IACR), established in 1997 to foster the discussion, propagation and development of critical realist approaches to understanding and changing the world. It provides a forum for scholars wishing to promote realist emancipatory philosophy, social theory and science on an interdisciplinary and international basis, and for those who wish to engage with such an approach.

This looks like a great idea. Despite having decided I don’t want to do asexuality research anymore, I’m rather tempted to have a serious go at setting out my idea about the historical emergence of the sexual assumption in the hope I can get some corpus linguists interested in helping me investigate it:

We are Mandy, Katharina and Federica writing on behalf of RiGLS, the research group in gender, language and sexuality at Lancaster University (UK), founded by Dr Jane Sunderland. For more information on RiGLS, please visit our page: http://www.ling.lancs.ac.uk/groups/rigls/index.htm

We would like invite researchers interested in sexuality and/or gender in conjunction with language and/or a linguistic approach to come to any number of our sessions and/or to give a talk themself.
The sessions usually take place on Wednesdays, from 2 to 3.30pm (within term-time). Please find attached our programme for the current term.
Please do not hesitate to contact us with a suggestion for a talk in the future. We would be happy to accommodate your needs in terms of time and day of the week.

The Department of Linguistics and English Language is a very vibrant one in terms of both teaching and research and we are only one among many research groups active in the department. You can have a look at all the Research Groups here: http://www.ling.lancs.ac.uk/research/index.htm. We also at times team up with some of these groups to provide joint talks, for example this term with UCREL (Computer Corpus Research on Language) and LIP (Language, Identity and Power) on automatically detecting gender bias in media coverage (http://www.ling.lancs.ac.uk/groups/lip/current.htm).
Interdisciplinary work in general is very welcome. We also encourage presentations on work in progress. One of our aims is to facilitate constructive criticism and exchange of expertise between researchers in the wide field of gender, language and sexuality.

We have a small fund available to help with external speakers’ expenses such as train journeys within the UK.

If you are interested in giving a talk at RiGLS or you would like to come to a talk and would like further information please get in touch with us:
Mandy Yu: h.yu7@lancaster.ac.uk
Katharina Wind: k.wilhelm@lancaster.ac.uk
Federica Formato: f.formato@lancaster.ac.uk
We also have a facebook page “RiGLS” and our Twitter account is @RiGLS.

We hope to hear from you.

The RiGLS coordinators

I wrote an overly brief post recently about the Elliot Rodger case (in the process offending some guys who are nice, though not ‘nice guys’) – this article by Richard Seymour, prefixed with a trigger warning, deftly shows how there’s much more to this case than just one person’s contingent hatred and brutality:

This is why it is essential, though not sufficient, to listen to what Rodger says. The killer left a detailed life story, and many video diaries, and his obsessions with gender, class and race, his framework of privilege and entitlement, structure the entirety of his account. The hatred and resentment toward women in particular, and the masculinist fantasies of retribution and cleansing, provide the quilting point, through which he explains his issues to himself: everything can be resolved if only they can be made to pay. And there is no obvious reason why a mental illness should express itself in such a toxic fusion of gendered, classed and raced resentment and rage, leading to the premeditated “slaughter” of seven people (including himself), like “animals”.

Before going any further, I would add that in explaining himself the killer clearly sought to aestheticise his actions, and courted precisely the wide audience for his own gargantuan melodrama that he regarded as befitting his proper status, and which he has now obtained. As he put it, “infamy is better than total obscurity”. To talk about him, to review and punctuate his own words, is to be partially complicit in this. But there is one way in which to avoid being complicit, and that is to categorically reject the demonological approach and to notice the appallingly quotidian, commonplace nature of the ideologies informing this atrocity, and the equally too common systemic and individual violence against women that these ideologies are linked to. Because Rodger is not so unusual among twenty-something males. You’ve met men like him. His issues, his insecurities, the huge burden of resentment and shame, the ideology of violent women-hatred that he gives realisation to, are all too widespread. And this is what is most frightening, and what is missed by the rush to confine this case to a psychological black box.

I think Richard’s point here is really important. The refusal to analyse a case like this in anything other than its own terms, treating it entirely as an expression of the inner strivings of the individual at its centre, entails complicity in that person’s own self-aggrandisement. We have a moral responsibility to analyse cases like this – to not treat them as entirely exempt from history while also avoiding the risk that we reduce them to the banal and everyday (to borrow a distinction from Bauman). In analysing them we refuse Rodger’s aspiration to be a ‘god’ in relation to the ‘animals’, instead showing how his actions reflect much broader trends which, when inflected through his personal cruelty and rage, led to these horrific crimes.

This looks good:

Link to the Journal Issue:

http://link.springer.com/journal/10767/27/2/page/1

List of Contents:

1) Susie Jacobs and Christian Klesse: lntroduction: Special Issue on “Gender, Sexuality and Political Economy” (pp 129-152)

2) Floya Anthias:  The Intersections of Class, Gender, Sexuality and ‘Race’: The Political Economy of Gendered Violence (pp 153-171)

3) Susie Jacobs: Gender, Land and Sexuality: Exploring Connections (pp 173-190)

4) Encarnación Gutiérrez-Rodríguez: The Precarity of Feminisation (pp 191-202)

5) Christian Klesse: Poly Economics—Capitalism, Class, and Polyamory (pp 203-220)

6) Ana Victoria Portocarrero Lacayo: Service Is Not Servitude: Links Between Capitalism and Feminist Liberal Conceptions of Pleasure—Case Studies from Nicaragua (pp 221-239)

7) Jon Binnie: “Neoliberalism, Class, Gender and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Politics in Poland” (pp. 241-257)

8) Kimberly Kay Hoang: Vietnam Rising Dragon: Contesting Dominant Western Masculinities in Ho Chi Minh City’s Global Sex Industry (pp 259-271)

The special issue is based on a workshop “Gender, Sexuality and Political Economy”, which took place 24–25 May 2011 at Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. We organised this workshop to create a space to bring work on gender and sexuality in dialogue. The workshop, which was sponsored by MMU’s Institute of Humanities and Social Science Research, explored possible complementarities and overlaps (or else, contradictions or noncompatibilities) between approaches within feminism, gender studies, transgender studies, lesbian, gay, bisexual and queer studies, with the aim of strengthening our understanding of the current conditions for collaborative agency and coalitional struggles and for more egalitarian social change(s). Contributions addressed questions linked to gendered and sexual positionings and gendered labour in the context of economic crisis and growing social class divisions in different locations. They also explored the construction of gendered and sexual subjectivities and politics in the context of specific welfare, migration and consumption regimes in a range of geographical settings. Other discussions included links between economic factors (for example poverty, deregulation, neoliberal programmes) and intimate and sexual practices and shifting identities. We are pleased now to be able to present some of the research contributions which were first presented at this workshop. The papers chosen for this special issue include keynote presentations from the workshop, a selection of papers presented and some specially commissioned work. The special issue has been designed to reinforce the “gendering” and “queering” of debates on political economy and to infuse work on gender and sexuality with class and economic perspectives.

The Centre for the Study of Women and Gender of the University of Warwick is delighted to invite you to its 2014 Annual Lecture.

The lecture is free to attend (no registration required) and open to all.

Monday, May 12th, 2014, from 5.00 to 7.00

Ramphal Building, room 1.13

PROFESSOR GRISELDA POLLOCK (University of Leeds)

Is Feminism a Bad Memory or a Virtual Future?

Abstract: What is the nature of feminist memory in contesting the impoverished memory being produced for feminism, within and without the ‘feminist’ communities?  Why are certain stories, tropes, and habits in representation of feminism of the later twentieth century so tenacious despite critical resistance and despite the hard evidence that things were not like that? Has feminism become, or produced for itself, a ‘bad memory’? How much is this the problem of the institutionalization of any radical ‘event’ and the structural issues of transmission? If the temporality of our current situation is the contemporary, how is this impacting on the capacity to imagine feminism as more than a historical event receding into the past, losing its relevance before ever new challenges? How can the different moments of its emergence, elaboration, retreat and reinvention over many centuries and in different sites worldwide engender different ways of understanding the point at which we find ourselves now in the becoming of feminism?

My paper will explore the potential of the feminist philosophical discourse on virtuality and hence of open futures in relation of another posture of political fidelity to the core project of thinking difference. How might we move beyond the ‘bad’ memory and enliven a sense of feminist continuities that are neither nostalgic nor disappointed, metaphorized neither by generation nor waves? Can we think the times of feminism and its commitment to the as yet unimagined beyond the limitations of such metaphors and outside the compulsive search for new fashions typical of liquid modernity? To what extent can the resources of feminist cultural thinking in and through art up to this point cease to be the historical archive deadened by our limited stories and become the resource for feminism’s lively virtuality and enabling relevance to the challenges of the unstable present?

GRISELDA POLLOCK is Professor of Social and Critical Histories of Art and Director of the Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory and History (CENTRECATH) at the University of Leeds. Committed to developing an international, postcolonial, queer feminist analysis of the visual arts and cultures, she is currently researching issues of trauma and the aesthetic, Aby Warburg’s legacies, and concentrationary memory. Her most recent publications include After-affects I After-images: Trauma and Aesthetic Transformation(Manchester, 2013); Bracha Ettinger: Art as Compassion (with Catherine de Zegher, ASA 2011);Concentrationary Memories: Totalitarian Terror and Cultural Resistance (with Max Silverman, I B Tauris, 2013); Art in the Time-Space of Memory and Migration  (Freud Museum and Wild Pansy Press, 2013) and the edited collection  Visual Politics of Psychoanalysis: Art & the Image in Post-traumatic Cultures (I B Tauris, 2013). Her forthcoming books include The Nameless Artist: Charlotte Salomon’s Life? or Theatre? as Theatre of Memory (Yale), and  From Trauma to Cultural : Representation and the Shoah / Holocaust.

For the full event webpage, see

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/sociology/rsw/research_centres/gender/forthcomingevents/annuallecture2014

Useful Information

(The Ramphal building is marked with the number 53, and appears at the centre of the map, within square 4D.)

Gender:

A Conference about Female and Transgender Masculinities

16 and 17 June 2014 – Leeds Art Gallery

This conference is inspired by the artwork (and lives) of the artists Marlow Moss and Claude Cahun which will be shown in exhibitions at Leeds Art Gallery during the summer of 2014. It will explore female and transgender masculinities in the context of visual arts, queer culture and community engagement. In a lively combination of key note presentations and participative workshops this event will generate and discuss strategies to challenge negative attitudes to gender variance. It is hoped that the event will attract diverse participants including academics, artists, activists and professionals.

Themes could include:

 Artist-led workshops exploring female and transgender masculinities, drag and
camp.

 Female and transgender masculinities, performativity and queer theories.

 Health and wellbeing issues and hate crime victimisations arising from negative
attitudes to gender variance.

 Gender binarism and sports including perceived risks of becoming masculine
and associations with lesbianism and transgenderism.

 Queer cultural readings of the artists’ work, other LGBTQ historical individuals
and the time period.

 Perspectives on the conference themes influenced by intersectionality
particularly post-colonial/critical race theories, Jewish queer culture (both
artists had Jewish heritage) and disability theories.

Proposals for both academic papers and participative workshops will be considered.
150 word proposals to be sent to: jude.woods@leeds.gov.uk no later than 25.4.14,

BSA Gender Study Group and BSA Youth Study Group

Masculinities, Adaptation and Difference

A joint, one day seminar

http://bsamasculinities.wordpress.com/

BSA Meeting Room, Imperial Wharf, London

Friday 4 July 2014

Call for Papers

Deadline extended to 25.04.2014

Since the late 1970s critical studies of men and masculinities have explored the ways in which men’s lives have been shaped by a variety of cultural, political and economic transformations, from increasing gender equality and the growing recognition of LGBT rights to the wide-ranging transformations in employment associated with globalization and neo-liberal capitalism. On the whole, research about men over this period of scholarship may be seen as having coalesced around the theme of adaptation, with different groups of men interpreted as either succeeding or failing in their attempts to adapt to new circumstances. Thus, while hegemonic forms of masculinity have been regarded as capable of adapting to changing circumstances while retaining their dominance, other, more subordinate forms of masculinity have often been regarded as failing to adapt to the new demands and realities of more feminized labour markets and liberal societies.

While a welcome corrective to popular representations or notions of masculinity as a singular, essentialised form, this body of work as a whole might be accused of presenting a somewhat polarized portrait of men, which not only exaggerates the extent of change or resistance to change at these two extremes, but also misses the more subtle forms of adaptation and resistance amongst ‘middling’ men.

This seminar invites a broader perspective on men’s adaptations from across the spectrum of masculinities, drawing attention to the diverse ways in which men with different social characteristics have adapted to changing demands in different spheres of their lives. In particular, echoing recent work in the study of femininities, it invites perspectives on the ways in which class, ethnicity, age, and other aspects of difference shape men’s responses to neo-liberal demands for ‘self-making’ across three interconnected spheres: education and employment, lifestyles and consumption, and family. What pressures are different men under to ‘reinvent themselves’ across these different spheres, how are these pressures experienced, and to what extent are emergent ways of ‘being a man’ available to men across a range of subject positions? In exploring these questions, we understand masculinity as not necessarily fixed to the ‘sexed’ body and thus take account of female and trans masculinities.

Abstracts of 300-400 words should be sent to bsamasculinities@gmail.com<mailto:bsamasculinities@gmail.com> by Friday 25 April 2014.

Organisers: Charlie Walker (University of Southampton), Steven Roberts (University of Kent), Sally Hines (University of Leeds) and Zowie Davy (University of Lincoln)

Fees: £25 for BSA members; £40 non members

To book online please go http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/event/eventBooking.aspx?id=EVT10355

Or to contact the event department at the BSA please send your question to events@britsoc.org.uk<mailto:events@britsoc.org.uk>

You are warmly invited to submit proposals for the forthcoming Gender and Disability event at the University of Sheffield. The Call for Ideas has been extended by one week and submissions will now be accepted up until midnight on Monday 3rd March 2014. Please pass this message on to anyone who may be interested. We look forward to hearing from you. Thank you.

GENDER AND DISABILITY: Asking Difficult Questions

Saturday 10th May 2014, Humanities Research Institute (HRI), University of Sheffield

We’re calling for activists, artists, academics and practitioners to get involved in a day of discussions on the theme of gender and dis/ability. We welcome ideas for the sharing of skills and stories, art, films, performances, poetry, workshops, round-table discussions, papers and presentations.

The event aims to create a space for conversations and debate between communities who share an interest in gender and disability.

Some ideas for topics/themes:

(Dis)ableism, discrimination, exclusion and (in)accessibility
‘Abnormal’, ‘Normal’ and Normalcy
Activism and protest (disability, feminist, LGBTQI, ‘race’, queer)
Austerity/welfare cuts
Body image, fetishisation, and the medicalization of bodies and minds
Desire, Sexuality, intimacy and relationships
Freakery, the abject and the politics of disgust
Health and Illness
Identities and identity politics
Life-course and ageing
Mental health and mad pride
Post-humanism
Queer and crip histories
Sex, sex educators and sex workers

Send us your ideas (around 200 words or half a page of bullet points) by 3rd March 2014 to gender.disability@shef.ac.uk.
This will be a free event. Food will be available to buy at the venue. We want to make this event as accessible as possible, to inform us of any particular access requirements please email gender.disability@shef.ac.uk by 19th April 2014.

For further information please contact gender.disability@shef.ac.uk. To book a place please go to: http://genderanddisability.wordpress.com.

Hosted by the Gender Research Network (affiliated to the Centre for Gender Research), University of Sheffield,
and the Disability Research Forum, Sheffield Hallam University

Twitter: @GenDisability

Laddism and Higher Education

A one-day SEN symposium discussing masculine behaviours and student culture.

The Student Experience Network of the SRHE is holding a one day symposium on laddism and Higher Education. Its focus is on the intersection of such masculine behaviours with student culture, minorities, lived experience, and the night-time economy, all areas which also inform and shape pedagogical identities. The day has been organised following the NUS’ 2013 report on lad culture in higher education, That’s What She Said and is thus orientated towards asking how the HE sector should respond to research findings and what further research is necessary.

Emerging Themes from That’s What She Said with a discussion on further research and actions

Isabel Young (co-author of report), seconded by Kelly Temple (NUS)

This presentation reports on a research project, funded by the National Union of Students, which sought to explore women students’ experiences of ‘lad culture’ in educational, social and personal spheres. The project consisted of two parts: (1) a thematic literature review covering areas such as gender and education, cultural studies and policy sociology; and (2) in-depth qualitative research using focus groups and semi-structured interviews with a sample of 40 women students, focusing on their experiences of teaching and learning, extra-curricular activities, social life, and sex and relationships. The findings of this research show that although ‘laddism’ is only one of a variety of potential masculinities, there exists at least a significant minority of women students who find ‘lad cultures’ problematic, citing issues such as misogynist ‘banter’, objectification of women and sexual pressure and harassment. This presentation explores some of the key themes to have emerged from the report, including the evolution of ‘laddism’ and its existence as a behaviour; the connection between night economies and the propagation of ‘lad culture’; intersections between gender, race, (dis)ability, sexuality and ‘lad culture’, and more. It will conclude by looking ahead to further research possibilities and actions around the impact of ‘lad culture’ in higher education and more broadly.

Isabel Young has a BA in Sociology and an MA in Gender Studies from the University of Sussex. Her research has explored BAME women’s experiences of anti-Muslim racism, constructions of sexual violence on Facebook ‘banter’ sites, and most recently, the impact of ‘lad culture’ on women students in higher education. She has worked with Survivor’s Network, Woman’s Hour and UK Uncut on the issues of VAWG and the cuts. Isabel currently runs a community programme for migrant mothers as part of the Arbour’s Migrant Women’s Mentoring and Social Inclusion project based in East London.

isabelkayoung@gmail.com

Kelley Temple is the NUS National Women’s Officer and is based in London. Kelley primarily works on campaigning for the rights of Student Carers, Tackling Lad Culture in Education and tackling women’s underrepresentation through Women in Leadership. Kelley is also a member of the Abortion Rights Executive Committee, a board member of the policy organisation Engender and represents NUS UK on Higher Education Policy at the European Student Union. Previously she was the NUS Scotland Women’s Officer, a Member of the Scottish Youth Parliament (MSYP) where she Convened the Education and Lifelong Learning Committee and was also a sabbatical officer at the University of Strathclyde Students’ Association. Kelley is from Glasgow and studied Politics at the University of Strathclyde. kelley.temple@nus.org.uk

 

Degrees of Laddishness: Laddism in Higher Education

Prof. Carolyn Jackson and Dr. Stephen Dempster

This paper provides insights into how laddism is understood, perpetuated, legitimated and challenged among undergraduates in two British universities. We explore the perceived benefits of subscribing to laddish masculinities, and also the costs of laddishness for male and female students in both student social life and teaching/learning environments. We discuss the ways that laddishness can be problematic for men as well as women, but argue that viewing laddishness as existing in a continuum of potential masculine subject positionings not only  enables a more sophisticated understanding of laddishness, but also may suggest strategies through which more extreme laddism might be challenged.

Carolyn Jackson is a Professor in the Department of Educational Research at Lancaster University, and Co-Director of the Centre for Social Justice and Wellbeing in Education. She has published widely on gender issues in education. Her books include Lads and Ladettes in School: Gender and a Fear of Failure (2006), and Girls and Education 3-16: Continuing Concerns, New Agendas (2010, co-edited with Carrie Paechter and Emma Renold). She is currently engaged in two projects exploring laddism in higher education.

c.jackson2@lancaster.ac.uk

Dr. Steven Dempster is a Research and Teaching Associate in the Department of Educational Research at Lancaster University and the Dean of one of Lancaster’s undergraduate colleges.  Steve has published a number of papers on laddism in higher education and is currently working on a further project on laddism in HE, an evaluation of enhancement of teaching and learning in Scottish HEIs, and a study of the impact of the Harry Potter franchise on boys’ literacies.

s.dempster@lancaster.ac.uk

Chanting Students

Dr. Matthew Cheeseman

I began researching and collecting examples of student chanting in 2005 and have found them a stimulating way of thinking about students and their experience of higher education. Far from simple, chants are both verbal forms and performances, full of contradictory meanings and creadings. In this paper I look at how they are received by others and how they operate as expressions of student identity and enactments of ‘lad culture’. Using data collected following an ethnographic methodology, I attempt to situate chanting within larger and no less contradictory performances (such as being a student) and explain its relationship to a language that has become a totemic within the United Kingdom: banter.

Dr. Matthew Cheeseman is a Research and Teaching Associate at the University of Sheffield. He works between English Literature, Folklore, Creative Writing, Music and Education. Alongside Dr. Camille Kandiko, he convenes the Student Experience Network for the SRHE, arranging approximately three symposiums a year. He blogs at www.einekleine.com.

Round table on Students’ Union responses, programmes and strategies alongside thoughts on further research.

Abigail Burman, Sophie van der Ham and Kelly Temple

Abigail Burman is an American undergraduate at the University of Oxford. During her time at university she’s served as her college’s Equal Opportunities Officer, focusing on issues of violence and harassment and helped form the first University-wide campaign against sexual violence. 

Sophie van der Ham completed a BA in English literature and linguistics at the University of Amsterdam & Edinburgh. She came to the University of Sussex to study an MA in Gender Studies and co-chaired the Women’s Group on campus. She was elected welfare officer at the University of Sussex Students’ Union and is carrying on the zero tolerance to sexual harassment and discrimination campaign that was started by the previous welfare officer. The campaign has been mentioned by The Guardian and aims to work constructively with the University in introducing a sexual violence policy. 

The day will conclude with a general discussion, with the option to splinter into smaller groups in order to discuss research strands.

 

Network: Student Experience
Date(s): Friday, 07 February 2014
Times: 10.30 – 16.30
Signup Deadline: Wednesday, 05 February 2014
Location: 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE
Lunch Provided: Yes
Spaces Left: Places available
Prices: Members: Free, Guests: £45.00

The CSWG Graduate Seminar Series starts off this term with a seminar entitled Constructing Sexual Subjects to be held on Wednesday the 22th of January,5pm-7pm in the Ramphal Builing, room R0.14.

Presentations:

Julieta Vartabedian, University of Newcastle

Do they transgress? On Brazilian travesti sex workers and their perceptions of themselves.

Stephen Symons, University of Northampton

Any swing goes? Discursive constructions of swinger- identities in a mononormative and gendered culture.

Jacob Breslow, London School of Economics

The Theory and Practice of Childhood: Interrogating the Gendered, Sexual, Racial and National Deployment of Childhood in Contemporary British and American Contexts.

For more information on the seminars running this term, please visit the graduate seminar website for more information: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/sociology/rsw/research_centres/gender/graduateseminars/