I just spotted New Philosopher for the first time, in an airport newsagents. I’ve occasionally bought or subscribed to Philosopher’s Magazine and Philosophy Now in the past. That makes three popular magazines about philosophy aimed at a general audience. Why such an abundance of philosophy magazines and yet no comparable sociology publications? Is it because the public appetite couldn’t support a sociology magazine? Or is it because sociologists haven’t tried since New Society folded? Is it time for Discover Society to launch a print edition? Or something else entirely?

Dear Colleague,

I hope that you have come across Discover Society the online magazine which publishes pieces based on social science research for a wide audience – you may even have written for us – but if not do check it out at discoversociety.org

As Editors we are committed ensuring that the magazine continues to be free at the point of access and to keeping our costs low, but we want to develop the magazine further and need to cover the costs of doing so.

Discover Society is approaching its third anniversary and is definitely a success – with over 25,000 hits on the site every month, close to 9,000 followers on Twitter, and a steady stream of people wanting to write pieces. If you enjoy Discover Society/ think it is useful for getting sociological research out there and you would like to help it to flourish please support it (either individually or as a Department) by becoming a ‘Friend of Discover Society’ and donating a small amount (or larger if you like!).

Your support would mean that we could:

  • Fund the increasing costs of hosting and maintaining the website
  • Fund the continuation of the Discover Society Internship
  • Host Discover Society Lectures and other events to increase the reach of the magazine and the impact of the contributions
  • Increase our support for making social science research more accessible

If you would like to help us to do these things, and more, please support the magazine by becoming a Friend of Discover Society via the Donate button on the front page at discoversociety.org.

All good wishes

Sue Scott
John Holmwood
Gurminder K Bhambra

Managing Editors of Discover Society

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Discover Society is a free online magazine featuring articles on social research, policy analysis and commentary. It is supported by Policy Press and endorsed by the British Sociological Association and the Social Policy Association.

We publish short (1500 word) research-based articles on a variety of topics. We also publish: ‘Viewpoints’ (on current social issues); ‘Policy Briefings’; ‘On the Frontline’, and a longer, ‘Focus’ article in each issue.

Deadlines: mid-month for publication first Wednesday each month.

Guidance for contributors, here: http://www.discoversociety.org/contribute/

Potential contributions can be discussed in advance with the editors via a short ‘pitch’ sent to: discoversociety@outlook.com

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http://discoversociety.org

ISSUE NINE: June 2014
   
Focus:  
Sue Scott On the Truth in Sex: The Times they are a-Changin’, or Not
 
Articles:
Ruth Holliday, David Bell, Meredith Jones & Olive Cheung Clinical Trails: Cosmetic Surgery Tourism
Stephen Crossley “Joining the Dots”? The Role of Research in the ‘Troubled Families’ Agenda
Naaz Rashid Framing Integration: The New Assimilation
Navtej Purewal The Two Iron Ladies of 1984: Remembering the Postcoloniality of Operation Blue Star Thirty Years On
Stevi Jackson Mother/ Daughter Relationships: Cultural Difference and Modernity
Jenny van Hooff Conscious Uncoupling: Reassessing Agency and Desire in Couple Relationships
Steve Garner Freeze Frame? Resisting the Relevance of Films about Slavery
Maggie O’Neill The Slow University: Work, Time and Well-Being
                Susie Scott, Liz McDonnell& Matt Dawson Asexual Lives: Social Relationships and Intimate Encounters
Noor-ul-Ain Khawaja &Muhammad Hashsham Khan Egypt: From Mubarak to Sisi
Viewpoint:
James Hampshire UKIP’s Fox in the Henhouse
 
On the Frontline:  
Anonymous Crude Power in Thailand’s 2014 Coup: Old Soldiers Almost Die
 
Policy Briefing:
James Wilson Care.Data and the Future of the NHS

 

Managing Editors: John Holmwood (Nottingham) and Sue Scott (York)

Editorial Board: Kehinde Andrews (Newman); Lorenza Antonucci (West of Scotland);

Les Back (Goldsmiths); Ben Baumberg (Kent); Gurminder K. Bhambra (Warwick);

Mark Carrigan (Warwick); Suzanne Hall (LSE); Steve MacKay (Lincoln); David Mellor (Oxford); Katherine Smith (Edinburgh); Emma Uprichard (Warwick)

Editorial Assistant: Rachel Jones

 

Twitter: @discoversoc | Facebook |Email: discoversociety@outlook.com

 

Published by Social Research Publishing (a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee)​

 

It was interesting to follow the #BritSoc14 tweeting last week. The quality and quantity of the live tweeting was quite striking relative to previous conferences. Not surprisingly, it was the digital sociology sessions that provoked the most live tweeting. If Twitter is a reliable guide, which it probably isn’t, digital sociology seemed to be one of the most high profile topics at the conference. I was a bit dismayed to have missed the session I organised on Digital Public Sociology but thankfully Huw Davies recorded the talks:

I’m not sure if ‘Digital Public Sociology’ is a useful expression. But it’s how I’ve come to think of a topic that’s been one of my main interests ever since the first year of my PhD when I encountered Pierre Bourdieu’s public sociology at the same time as I was starting to see the academic relevance of blogging (which had long been a fairly directionless hobby of mine). There was a great day at Warwick, organised by Michelle Kempson and Lucy Mayblin, called the Politics of Sociology which helped connect these things in my mind. But I’m finding ‘digital public sociology’ useful because it’s the first time I’ve been able to articulate my interest in a way that doesn’t feel reductive, having formerly found myself saying rather sheepishly “er I’m interesting in sociologists blogging and tweeting and stuff”.

Edited to add: the disparity in the stats between the three talks is really striking. I hadn’t actually thought about the running order (I just added them in the order I uploaded the files) but it does seem as if Deborah’s talk is much more visible as a consequence of being first in the playlist.

DISCOVER SOCIETY

Measured-Factual-Critical

http://discoversociety.org

ISSUE FIVE:

February 2014

 

Focus:

 

Andrew McGettigan

Managerialism, Democracy and the New Political Economy of English Higher Education

 

Articles:

                              

Mary Stuart

Reconnecting and Re–Purposing the Civic Purpose of Universities

Diane Reay

From Academic Freedom to Academic Capitalism

Nick Stevenson

Wars Over English The Culture Schools

Timothy Clarke, Pojanath Bhatanacharoen & David Greatbatch

Manufacturing Management Celebrity

Malcolm James

Mark Duggan and Britain’s Postcolonial Politics of Death

Paola Tubaro

Why Online Privacy is not Dead: Negotiation and Conflict in Social Media

Michael O’Regan

The Tyrannies of Collaborative Consumption

Des Fitzgerald, Nikolas Rose,
& Ilina Singh

Urban Life and Mental Health: Re-Visiting Politics, Society and Biology

                Jackie Turton

Moral Panics and Youth Crime – Where are the Girls?

John Veit-Wilson

Poverty 50 Years On – But What is Poverty?

Viewpoint:

 

Priyamvada Gopal

The Assault on Higher Education and Democracy

 

On the Frontline:

 

Mahmoona Shah

Further Education – for other people’s children?

 

Policy Briefing:

 

John Holmwood

Whither Fees and Loans?

Managing Editors: John Holmwood (University of Nottingham) and Sue Scott (University of York)

Editorial Board: Kehinde Andrews (Newman University); Lorenza Antonucci (University of West of Scotland); Les Back (Goldsmiths); Ben Baumberg (University of Kent); Gurminder K. Bhambra (University of Warwick); Mark Carrigan (University of Warwick); Suzanne Hall (LSE); Steve MacKay (University of Lincoln); David Mellor (University of Oxford); Alison Shaw (Policy Press at the University of Bristol); Katherine Smith (University of Edinburgh); Emma Uprichard (University of Warwick).

Twitter: @discoversoc | Facebook |Email: discoversociety@outlook.com

Published by Social Research Publishing (a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee)

 

Please circulate on local lists

DISCOVER SOCIETY

Measured-Factual-Critical

http://discoversociety.org

ISSUE Three:

December 2013

Special Issue on Wealth

 

 

Focus:

 

John Hills

The Distribution of Wealth: What We Think and How It Is

 

 

Articles:

                         

Caroline Knowles

Millionaires Welcome: UK Migration and London Neighbourhoods

John Urry

The Rich-Class and Offshore Worlds

Beverley Searle

Help to Wealth-Fare

Roger Burrows

The New Gilded Ghettoes: The Geo-Demographics of the Super-Rich 

Beth Breeze

Mathew Bond

Adam Leaver

Why Do Rich People Give?

Elite Conviviality and the British Political Class

Growth in Whose Interests?

Norman Stockman

In Praise of Ralph Miliband, Political Sociologist       

Graham Scambler

From Power Elite to Ruling Oligarchy

Sam Hillyard

‘My Toothbrush Isn’t Foaming’: The Changing Status of the Rural Upper Class

                

 

Viewpoint:

 

Rajiv Prabhakar

The Case for Inheritance Tax

 

 

On the Frontline:

 

Rowland Atkinson

Domestic Sovereigns: Wealth and Public Space

 

 

Policy Briefing:

 

Matt Barnes

Home-Owners Get Richer and the Housing Ladder Gets Pulled Up

Managing Editors: John Holmwood (University of Nottingham) and Sue Scott (University of York)

Editorial Board: Kehinde Andrews (Newman University); Lorenza Antonucci (University of West of Scotland); Les Back (Goldsmiths); Ben Baumberg (University of Kent); Gurminder K. Bhambra (University of Warwick); Mark Carrigan (University of Warwick); Suzanne Hall (LSE); Steve MacKay (University of Lincoln); David Mellor (University of Oxford); Katherine Smith (University of Edinburgh); Emma Uprichard (University of Warwick).

Twitter: @discoversoc https://twitter.com/DiscoverSoc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoversociety

Email: discoversociety@outlook.com

Published by Social Research Publishing (a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee)

Issue 2 of online magazine of social research, policy analysis and commentary, Discover Society, out today.

DISCOVER SOCIETY

Measured-Factual-Critical

http://discoversociety.org

ISSUE TWO:

November 2013

 

 

Focus:

 

Danny Dorling

Dismantling Universalism: Inequality and Public Health

 

Articles:

                         

John Brewer

Culture, Class and Protestantism in Urban Belfast

 Lynn Jamieson

John MacInnes and

                                Sin Yi Cheung

Tom Shakespeare

How Spare are Bedroom-Tax Rooms?

Creating Public Attitudes to Immigration by Mis-Counting

 

Day of Reckoning

Kehinde Andrews and

Lisa Palmer

Larry Ray

Why Black Studies Matters

 

Photography and the Public Sphere

Momin Rahman

Michael Farrelly

The Rise of Ideological Secularism: Quebec’s Proposed Charter of Values  

Debating Energy                      

Fiona McQueen

Rachel Thwaites

More Equal? Still Different?

What’s in a Name? Gendered Naming Practices and Identity in Britain

 

 

Viewpoint:

Julia O’Connell Davidson

What’s Wrong with Modern Slavery? Why Theresa May in Wilberforce’s Clothing Won’t Appeal to All

 

 

On the Frontline:

 

Saul Becker and Joe Sempik

Young Carers

 

Policy Briefing:

Stephen MacKay

Agency and the Child Support Agency

 

Managing Editors: John Holmwood (University of Nottingham) and Sue Scott (University of York)

Editorial Board: Kehinde Andrews (Newman University); Lorenza Antonucci (University of West of Scotland); Les Back (Goldsmiths); Ben Baumberg (University of Kent); Gurminder K. Bhambra (University of Warwick); Mark Carrigan (University of Warwick); Suzanne Hall (LSE); Steve MacKay (University of Lincoln); David Mellor (University of Oxford); Katherine Smith (University of Edinburgh); Emma Uprichard (University of Warwick).

Twitter: @discoversoc https://twitter.com/DiscoverSoc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoversociety

Email: discoversociety@outlook.com

 

Published by Social Research Publishing (a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee)

Announcing a new monthly online magazine of social research, policy analysis and commentary

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

DISCOVER SOCIETY

Measured-Factual-Critical

http://discoversociety.org

We publish short (1500 word) research-based articles on social topics. We also publish: ‘Viewpoints’ (on current social issues); ‘Policy Briefings’; ‘On the Frontline’, and a longer, ‘Focus’ article in each issue

We welcome contributions that are research-based and meet our guidance for contributors (available online: http://bit.ly/18LEZMg)

Potential contributions can be discussed in advance with the editors via a short ‘pitch’ sent to: discoversociety@outlook.com

Managing Editors: John Holmwood (University of Nottingham) and Sue Scott (University of York)

Editorial Board: Kehinde Andrews (Newman University); Lorenza Antonucci (University of West of Scotland); Les Back (Goldsmiths); Ben Baumberg (University of Kent); Gurminder K. Bhambra (University of Warwick); Mark Carrigan (University of Warwick); Emma Uprichard (University of Warwick); David Mellor (University of Oxford); Katherine Smith (University of Edinburgh).

Twitter: @discoversoc (https://twitter.com/DiscoverSoc)

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoversociety

Email: discoversociety@outlook.com

20131002-083243

DISCOVER SOCIETY

Measured-Factual-Critical

http://discoversociety.org

The first issue includes articles by: Gurminder K. Bhambra, Sam Friedman, Jacqui Gabb and Janet Fink, Peter Taylor-Gooby, Suzanne Hall, Lisa McKenzie, Alice Mah, James Nazroo, Karen Rowlingson and Steve McKay, Emma Uprichard, Alan Warde, and Mike Savage

Further details:

Twitter: @discoversoc (https://twitter.com/DiscoverSoc)

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoversociety

Email: discoversociety@outlook.com

Managing Editors: John Holmwood (University of Nottingham) and Sue Scott (University of York)

Editorial Board: Kehinde Andrews (Newman University); Lorenza Antonucci (University of West of Scotland); Les Back (Goldsmiths); Ben Baumberg (University of Kent); Gurminder K. Bhambra (University of Warwick); Mark Carrigan (University of Warwick); Suzanne Hall (LSE); David Mellor (University of Oxford); Katherine Smith (University of Edinburgh); Emma Uprichard (University of Warwick).

Announcing a new monthly online magazine of social research, policy analysis and commentary

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

DISCOVER SOCIETY

Measured-Factual-Critical

http://discoversociety.org

We publish short (1500 word) research-based articles on social topics. We also publish: ‘Viewpoints’ (on current social issues); ‘Policy Briefings’; ‘On the Frontline’, and a longer, ‘Focus’ article in each issue

We welcome contributions that are research-based and meet our guidance for contributors (available online: http://bit.ly/18LEZMg)

Potential contributions can be discussed in advance with the editors via a short ‘pitch’ sent to: discoversociety@outlook.com

Managing Editors: John Holmwood (University of Nottingham) and Sue Scott (University of York)

Editorial Board: Kehinde Andrews (Newman University); Lorenza Antonucci (University of West of Scotland); Les Back (Goldsmiths); Ben Baumberg (University of Kent); Gurminder K. Bhambra (University of Warwick); Mark Carrigan (University of Warwick); Emma Uprichard (University of Warwick); David Mellor (University of Oxford); Katherine Smith (University of Edinburgh).

Twitter: @discoversoc (https://twitter.com/DiscoverSoc)

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoversociety

Email: discoversociety@outlook.com