Tag: scholarly communication

  • The lessons of music culture for scholarly communication

    Dave Beer makes some interesting points in this short article which frames current debates about open access in terms of trends within music culture, which have been driven by broadly similar structural processes and have been playing themselves out for much longer. Some people argue that rendering academic publishing more ‘open’ could prove hugely problematic, […]

  • Open research and ‘self-promotion’

    I just read an interesting (though slightly depressing!) post from Nick Hopwood giving useful advice to PhDs and ECRs. I’m not quibbling with his advice per se and I genuinely enjoy his blog but I took issue with this paragraph: I had vague ideas that academics, with a few obvious exceptions, get on in their careers by doing […]

  • Some reflections on editing books and special issues while doing a PhD

    Some reflections on editing books and special issues while doing a PhD

    This interesting post by Pat Thomson left me speculating on the future of edited books. I co-edited an edited book (see below) early in my PhD, with an existing project inviting me onboard as a fourth editor – largely, I assume, because my knowledge of the  asexuality literature was useful to the project. It was a great […]

  • ‘Academic spring’ or media hype? The open acccess debate and what it means for researchers

    This session will explore the profound changes currently taking place within academic publishing and address their implications for researchers. Debates around ‘open access’ have recently entered mainstream debate, with the Guardian talking of an ‘academic spring’ building around the world. However the issues at stake go beyond open access and a focus on the technical […]