*CALL FOR PAPERS: Themed issue on ‘Radical negativity’*Over the past decade, feminist and queer scholarship has begun to productively address the dark aspects of human subjectivity, such as unhappiness, irresponsibility, passivity, vulnerability, failure, shame, hesitancy, pain, dispossession, disappointment, rage, madness and depression, contributing to a rethinking and revaluation of the negative.
Critique has focused on how normative subject positions are powerful mechanisms that reproduce dominant power structures such as whiteness, patriarchy, sexism, cissexism, heterosexism, and ableism. Such normative subject positions can demand or assume whiteness and thus position those who are non-white as ‘invaders’ in the space of the institution (Puwar 2009), present gender subservience as happiness (Ahmed 2010), and demand compulsory heterosexuality (Rich 1980). Resisting these (normative) demands placed on identities can form subjectivities perceived to be oriented around discomfort, refusal and pain

Borrowing from Eve Sedgwick, this special issue proposes that forms of the negative are “not distinctly ‘toxic’ parts of a group or individual identity that can be excised; they are instead integral to and residual in the processes by which identity itself is formed (2003, p.63).” In choosing to conceptualise subjectivity through the possibility of treating the negative as a viable and integral resource for resistance and a locus of social change, this issue will pay particular attention to the relation of negativity to resistant political practices. More specifically, we are interested in how the formation of subjectivities based on negative states and in relation to negative affects can be productive sites for political engagement. What is opened up or made possible by attending to the negative as an interruption to the force of restrictive social norms upon certain psyche and bodies?

We welcome papers based in any discipline that significantly engage feminist and queer theory to respond to one or more of the following questions:

  1. How can the negative be conceptualised as an interruption to the force of restrictive social norms?

  2. How might rejecting the social compulsion toward positive affect allow for, and even become necessary to, resisting normative structures of power?

  3. If we accept that power can differentially produce subjects, and that there is a relationship between power and resistance, how do these differences in turn utilise the negative, and what is the negative’s role in the capacity to resist?

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, explorations of:

  – the construction of normative subjectivities and their effects on those deemed not to ‘fit’

  – the construction of subjectivities in relation to narratives of trauma  or shame

  – queer subversion in the face of ambivalence, incoherence and difficulty

  – the relation between politics and the construction of ‘woundedness’

  – the distribution (and understanding) of vulnerability

  – the construction of health, happiness or ‘goodness’

  – the racialization of affect

  – the gendering of affect

  – the navigation/rejection of gender norms and cis-sexism

  – the ways in which gender, sexuality, race and ability inflect the  interpretation of affect more generally

  – deviance

  – name-calling

Issue editors: Ella Fegitz, Tiffany Page and Leila Whitley.

The deadline for first drafts of papers is 1 May 2016. Papers should be submitted in the first instance to radicalnegativity@gmail.com and should follow submission guidelines for Subjectivity (http://www.palgrave-journals.com/sub/author_instructions.html).

The editors are happy to discuss possible papers informally with potential contributors. Please contact: e.fegitz@gold.ac.uk; cup01tp@gold.ac.uk; l.whitley@gold.ac.uk

*References*

Ahmed, Sara. 2010. *The Promise of Happiness.* Durham and London: Duke University Press.

Puwar, Nirmal. 2004. *Space Invaders: Race, Gender and Bodies Out of Place. *Oxford: Berg.

Rich, Adrienne. 1980. “Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence,” *Journalof Women in Culture **and Society, *5, 4, 631-660.

Sedgwick, Eve. 2003. *Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity*.

Durham and London: Duke University Press.

Well this is interesting. Seems like Warwick is becoming a venue for the resurgence of what I had thought was a pretty moribund queer theory:

(Re)situating Queer Theory on the Critical Left
A Morning Seminar at Warwick University, 10.30am – 1pm, Friday 22 May 2015
Ramphal Building, Room R0.3-4

This seminar aims to explore and debate two influential recent attempts to (re)situate queer theory within the broader field of critical social and cultural theory on the Left, with a particular but not exclusive focus on the relevance of this discussion within French Studies:
James Penney, After Queer Theory: The Limits of Sexual Politics (London: Pluto, 2014).
Razmig Keucheyan, Hémisphère Gauche : une cartographie des nouvelles pensées critiques (Paris: La Découverte, 2nd ed. 2013), in particular pp. 284-91 in context. This book is also available in English asThe Left Hemisphere: Mapping Critical Theory Today (London: Verso, 2013), tr. Gregory Elliott.

This exploratory seminar is intended principally for early-career academics and post-graduate researchers in French Studies, Sociology, Gender Studies, Queer Studies, Women’s Studies and related areas but all are welcome. Participants are invited to offer a 5-10 minute paper, which could explore an aspect of either or both texts, in isolation or in relation to the speaker’s own work.

Participants are asked to signal their desire to take part to Oliver Davis (O.Davis@warwick.ac.uk) by 1 May 2015 and also to indicate whether or not they would like to deliver a short paper. Selected participants will be invited to develop their paper into a submission for the edited volume arising out of the AHRC-funded research project to which this workshop is attached, Queer Theory in France. Participants who have already confirmed their attendance at this seminar include Oliver Davis (French Studies, Warwick), Alex Dymock (Law, Criminology and Sociology, Royal Holloway), Elliot Evans (French, KCL), Hector Kollias (French, KCL), Kayte Stokoe (French Studies, Warwick), Matthew Waites (Sociology, Glasgow) and Emma Campbell (French Studies, Warwick).

The seminar will take place in Room R0.3-4, Ramphal Building (Main Campus). Room R0.03-4 is an accessible room on the Ground Floor of the Ramphal Building on the main campus of Warwick University. Travel directions to the campus may be found here:http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting For a map of the campus (the Ramphal Building is number 53, square D4) please see here:http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/maps/campusmap/

Please contact Oliver Davis with any questions (O.Davis@warwick.ac.uk)
 
Queer/Coercion
An Afternoon Critical Sexology in the Midlands Public Research Seminar, 2 – 5pm, Friday 22 May 2015
Warwick University, Ramphal Building, Room R0.03-4

Queer thought and activism may be defined by their vigilance to the varieties of violence with which norms coercively constitute gendered sexual subjects. At a moment when, in numerous national contexts, the work of sexual and gender policing is increasingly abetted by manifestations of organized state violence against dissidents – so extreme in some cases, as in Uganda, as to suggest the idea of genocide – this afternoon seminar will explore the topic of coercion in a global perspective and across the related fields of queer, feminist, and masculinity studies. Concretely, the event will focus on legal responses to the phenomenon of ‘revenge pornography’, on the representation in pop music videos of violence against men and on the scope and value of the concept of genocide for global queer politics resisting coercion in the particular context of Uganda. Questions to be explored include the following:
How does contemporary queer thought envisage and resist coercion?
How can we conceptualise feminist responses to ‘revenge pornography’?
How to account for the remobilisation of recognisably queer representational codes and strategies (e.g. camp) in mainstream music videos depicting violence against men?
To what extent is genocide a useful concept for global queer politics today?
How and why do queer, feminist, and masculinity studies differ in their apprehension of the coercive force of the law?

Speakers and paper titles:
Alex Dymock (Law, Criminology and Sociology, Royal Holloway), ‘Eroticising retribution?: criminalising “revenge pornography”
Marc Lafrance (Sociology, Concordia), ‘The Dark Side of Camp: Violence Against Men in Popular Music Videos Made by Women’

Matthew Waites (Sociology, Glasgow), ‘Queering Genocide’

Respondents: Oliver Davis (French Studies, Warwick) and Kayte Stokoe (French Studies, Warwick).

For further information about Queer/Coercion, including full paper abstracts and speaker biographies, please visit:http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/modernlanguages/research/french/currentprojects/queertheory/workshops/resituatingqueertheory/queercoercion/

This looks interesting:

Queerly Theorising Higher Education & Academia: Interdisciplinary Conversations

Half-day International Symposium

Monday 8th December 2014, 12 noon – 7:30pm, followed by a drinks reception

Room 802, Institute of Education (IOE), 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

This half-day international symposium brings together queer theorisations of higher education and academia that are currently developing within discipline-specific contexts. At this symposium, we will explore the ways that academia and higher education are being queerly theorised, and discuss how these theorisations are situated within and yet pushing against disciplinary settings. With an emphasis on conversation and discussion, the event will provide a platform for the collaborative development of ideas over the course of the day. Contributors to the round table and discussion-presentations range from established scholars to doctoral students, and are from a variety of disciplinary locations and institutional settings.

Round table participants:

Oliver Davis – University of Warwick

Michael O’Rourke – ISSH, Macedonia & Global Center for Advanced Studies

Nick Rumens – Middlesex University

Yvette Taylor – Weeks Centre, London South Bank University

Kathryn Medien – University of Warwick (Chair)

Presenters:

James Burford – University of Auckland, New Zealand/Aotearoa

Jennifer Fraser – Birkbeck

Vicky Gunn – University of Glasgow

Emily F. Henderson – Institute of Education

Genine Hook – Monash University, Australia

Z Nicolazzo – Miami University, Ohio, US

Sean Curran – Institute of Education (Chair)

Emma Jones – Institute of Education (Chair)

Discussants:

Elliot Evans – King’s College London

TBC

The event will be hosted by CHES (Centre for Higher Education Studies) and is funded by the Bloomsbury ESRC Doctoral Training Centre.

Registration is free, but places are limited so booking is essential.

To book, or for further information, contact Emily Henderson:ehenderson01@ioe.ac.uk

This looks helpful:

still queer / a postgraduate and early-career work-in-progress study day

Queer@King’s / King’s College, London / Saturday 13 September 2014

Queer@King’s invites proposals for presentations to be given at a collaborative work-in-progress study day. We hope to foster a supportive environment in which new work and ideas can be discussed among peers, with the opportunity of gaining valuable feedback from other PGRs, as well as from established faculty members.

Rather than insisting on a unifying topic within the broad remit of queer studies (by, say, identifying new trends or focussing on disciplining the field for its inevitable exclusions), we’re looking to create a space in which to simply share and learn from research that need not be unitary, which may indeed almost certainly be conflicting, but that is nevertheless still queer. The study day proposes that renewing the very energy that powered formative debates in queer studies (on sexuality and power, on intersectionality, on the globalisation of queer, on queering the past, etc.) may amount to the best way to make the simple and modest avowal in its title. With the scope to range over the broad terrain of queerness, we hope to be guided by the conversations that emerge rather than by a pre-defined focus.

We invite presentations on, among many other things:
queer studies’ past, as well as its present
queer studies’ historical as well as its geographical reach
queer studies’ utopian tendencies as well as its ‘anti-social’ refusals
queer studies’ conceptual expansion and its stubborn refusal to ‘go beyond’ sexuality
Please send abstracts of 300 words for 15-minute presentations to queer@kcl.ac.uk by Friday 25th July 2014

still queer / a postgraduate and early-career work-in-progress study day

Queer@King’s / King’s College, London / Saturday 13 September 2014

Queer@King’s invites proposals for presentations to be given at a collaborative work-in-progress study day. We hope to foster a supportive environment in which new work and ideas can be discussed among peers, with the opportunity of gaining valuable feedback from other PGRs, as well as from established faculty members.

Rather than insisting on a unifying topic within the broad remit of queer studies (by, say, identifying new trends or focussing on disciplining the field for its inevitable exclusions), we’re looking to create a space in which to simply share and learn from research that need not be unitary, which may indeed almost certainly be conflicting, but that is nevertheless still queer. The study day proposes that renewing the very energy that powered formative debates in queer studies (on sexuality and power, on intersectionality, on the globalisation of queer, on queering the past, etc.) may amount to the best way to make the simple and modest avowal in its title. With the scope to range over the broad terrain of queerness, we hope to be guided by the conversations that emerge rather than by a pre-defined focus.

We invite presentations on, among many other things:

queer studies’ past, as well as its present
queer studies’ historical as well as its geographical reach
queer studies’ utopian tendencies as well as its ‘anti-social’ refusals
queer studies’ conceptual expansion and its stubborn refusal to ‘go beyond’ sexuality

Please send abstracts of 300 words for 15-minute presentations to queer@kcl.ac.uk by Friday 25th July 2014.

CfP DEADLINE: MARCH 14TH

Tangentially Queer http://tangentiallyqueer.com: A Workshop on the Field Formation of Queer Theory

16th May, 2014: London School of Economics

Keynote speaker: Silvia Posocco (Birkbeck, University of London)

Call for papers:

Tangentially Queer seeks to explore the contemporary terrains of queer theorising, and its trajectories, histories, and field imaginaries. Throughout its academic history, “queer” has often been left undefined, a theoretical concept without fixed referent. This lack of definition is often attributed to the usefulness of “queer” as an elusive concept. Yet, against this undefinable ambition, contemporary queer theory tends to orientate itself around particular subjects and objects: it is common to hear reference to gay and lesbian lives, Butler and Sedgwick as canonical texts, and claims to deterritorialization and anti-normativity, for example. Despite the propagation of queer being undefiniable and infinitely useful, queer theory’s prioritized subjects and objects have become especially frequent and institutionalized within the Anglo-American academy.

Rather than take queer theory’s institutional status and object-attachments for granted, this one-day workshop asks that we situate the institutional life of queer theory within the broader contemporary context of the political economy of knowledge production. We ask, for example: within an increasingly marketized academic environment, how might queer theory’s field formation relate to the visibility, normalization, and legitimation of certain queer lives? Under what auspices of criticality, with which cultural texts, theoretical practices, forms of pedagogy, and methodological tendencies has the study of queerness been institutionalized? How might we think of the relations between queer theory’s increasing academic disciplinarity, its prevalent subjects and objects, and the broader drive for academic impact and political utility?

This one day workshop hopes to offer a space for a discussion of the contemporary landscape of queer theory by inquiring into how queerness has been taken up as field-formational, and what objects, narratives, methodologies, histories, and temporalities, are deemed vital to, tangential to, or separate from, the project of queerness. In doing so, Tangentially Queer hopes to explore and intervene in our investments in queer critique, attempting to realign them so as to consider different ways of thinking, doing, and being queer.

In exploring the topics of queerness, queer theory, and its trajectories and field imaginaries, and in conversation with the above, we invite proposals for 20 minute papers which might address, but are not limited to, the following themes:

“Proper” queer objects and subjects
The position, relevance, and necessity for anti-racist critique within queer theory
Transnational queer theories
Queer theory’s political agenda(s)
Queer times and generations
Queer theory’s relationship to lesbian and gay studies
Queer theory’s relationship to feminisms
Definitions of “queerness”
Queer theory’s relationship to academic institutions
Queer memories, histories, and archives
Queer theory and intersectional analysis
Alternative queer academic futures
Political economies of queer knowledge production

Please submit paper abstracts of 300-500 words along with a short biography of 150 words to:info@tangentiallyqueer.com by Friday 14 March.

Tangentially Queer is funded by the London School of Economics’ Teaching and Learning Centre via the Gender Institute. It is being held in conjunction with the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender at the University of Warwick.

Tangentially Queer http://tangentiallyqueer.com: A Workshop on the Field Formation of Queer Theory

16th May, 2014: London School of Economics

Call for papers:

Tangentially Queer seeks to explore the contemporary terrains of queer theorising, and its trajectories, histories, and field imaginaries. Throughout its academic history, “queer” has often been left undefined, a theoretical concept without fixed referent. This lack of definition is often attributed to the usefulness of “queer” as an elusive concept. Yet, against this undefinable ambition, contemporary queer theory tends to orientate itself around particular subjects and objects: it is common to hear reference to gay and lesbian lives, Butler and Sedgwick as canonical texts, and claims to deterritorialization and anti-normativity, for example. Despite the propagation of queer being undefiniable and infinitely useful, queer theory’s prioritized subjects and objects have become especially frequent and institutionalized within the Anglo-American academy.

Rather than take queer theory’s institutional status and object-attachments for granted, this one-day workshop asks that we situate the institutional life of queer theory within the broader contemporary context of the political economy of knowledge production. We ask, for example: within an increasingly marketized academic environment, how might queer theory’s field formation relate to the visibility, normalization, and legitimation of certain queer lives? Under what auspices of criticality, with which cultural texts, theoretical practices, forms of pedagogy, and methodological tendencies has the study of queerness been institutionalized? How might we think of the relations between queer theory’s increasing academic disciplinarity, its prevalent subjects and objects, and the broader drive for academic impact and political utility?

This one day workshop hopes to offer a space for a discussion of the contemporary landscape of queer theory by inquiring into how queerness has been taken up as field-formational, and what objects, narratives, methodologies, histories, and temporalities, are deemed vital to, tangential to, or separate from, the project of queerness. In doing so, Tangentially Queer hopes to explore and intervene in our investments in queer critique, attempting to realign them so as to consider different ways of thinking, doing, and being queer.

In exploring the topics of queerness, queer theory, and its trajectories and field imaginaries, and in conversation with the above, we invite proposals for 20 minute papers which might address, but are not limited to, the following themes:

“Proper” queer objects and subjects
The position, relevance, and necessity for anti-racist critique within queer theory
Transnational queer theories
Queer theory’s political agenda(s)
Queer times and generations
Queer theory’s relationship to lesbian and gay studies
Queer theory’s relationship to feminisms
Definitions of “queerness”
Queer theory’s relationship to academic institutions
Queer memories, histories, and archives
Queer theory and intersectional analysis
Alternative queer academic futures
Political economies of queer knowledge production

Please submit paper abstracts of 300-500 words along with a short biography of 150 words to: info@tangentiallyqueer.com by Friday 14 March.

Tangentially Queer is funded by the London School of Economics’ Teaching and Learning Center via the Gender Institute. It is being held in conjunction with the Center for the Study of Women and Gender at the University of Warwick.

Tangentially Queer<http://tangentiallyqueer.com>: A Workshop on the Field Formation of Queer Theory

16th May, 2014: London School of Economics

Call for papers:

Tangentially Queer seeks to explore the contemporary terrains of queer theorising, and its trajectories, histories, and field imaginaries. Throughout its academic history, “queer” has often been left undefined, a theoretical concept without fixed referent. This lack of definition is often attributed to the usefulness of “queer” as an elusive concept. Yet, against this undefinable ambition, contemporary queer theory tends to orientate itself around particular subjects and objects: it is common to hear reference to gay and lesbian lives, Butler and Sedgwick as canonical texts, and claims to deterritorialization and anti-normativity, for example. Despite the propagation of queer being undefiniable and infinitely useful, queer theory’s prioritized subjects and objects have become especially frequent and institutionalized within the Anglo-American academy.

Rather than take queer theory’s institutional status and object-attachments for granted, this one-day workshop asks that we situate the institutional life of queer theory within the broader contemporary context of the political economy of knowledge production. We ask, for example: within an increasingly marketized academic environment, how might queer theory’s field formation relate to the visibility, normalization, and legitimation of certain queer lives? Under what auspices of criticality, with which cultural texts, theoretical practices, forms of pedagogy, and methodological tendencies has the study of queerness been institutionalized? How might we think of the relations between queer theory’s increasing academic disciplinarity, its prevalent subjects and objects, and the broader drive for academic impact and political utility?

This one day workshop hopes to offer a space for a discussion of the contemporary landscape of queer theory by inquiring into how queerness has been taken up as field-formational, and what objects, narratives, methodologies, histories, and temporalities, are deemed vital to, tangential to, or separate from, the project of queerness. In doing so, Tangentially Queer hopes to explore and intervene in our investments in queer critique, attempting to realign them so as to consider different ways of thinking, doing, and being queer.

In exploring the topics of queerness, queer theory, and its trajectories and field imaginaries, and in conversation with the above, we invite proposals for 20 minute papers which might address, but are not limited to, the following themes:

“Proper” queer objects and subjects
The position, relevance, and necessity for anti-racist critique within queer theory
Transnational queer theories
Queer theory’s political agenda(s)
Queer times and generations
Queer theory’s relationship to lesbian and gay studies
Queer theory’s relationship to feminisms
Definitions of “queerness”
Queer theory’s relationship to academic institutions
Queer memories, histories, and archives
Queer theory and intersectional analysis
Alternative queer academic futures
Political economies of queer knowledge production

Please submit paper abstracts of 300-500 words along with a short biography of 150 words to: info@tangentiallyqueer.com<mailto:info@tangentiallyqueer.com> by Friday 14 March.

Tangentially Queer is funded by the London School of Economics’ Teaching and Learning Center via the Gender Institute. It is being held in conjunction with the Center for the Study of Women and Gender at the University of Warwick.

CfP – please feel free to forward and address any queries to the organisers.

Queering the Creative City – Call for Papers

Royal Geographical Society with IBG Annual Conference, London, 27-29 August 2014.

During the last decade, an increasing interest has been seen by urban and economic geographers around the creative economy, creative cities, and ‘creative class’, informing the development of a strong and rigorous body of academic research in the area (Chapain et al 2012). Within this debate, the work of Richard Florida (2002) continues to remains highly influential for policy-makers in search of economic growth and urban regeneration in a time of austerity, and has informed an abundance of urban branding and creative city developments. Whilst substantial critiques have been levelled at this work (eg. Peck 2005, Markusen 2006) one of its more contentious elements remains underexplored – that of ‘Technology, Talent, Tolerance’, which argues that “Gays can be thought of as the canaries of the knowledge economy because they signal a diverse and progressive environment that fosters the creativity and innovation necessary for success in a high-tech industry” (Florida and Gates 2001).

This session aims to interrogate and unpack this aspect of the urban and economic geography literature to ask: where do queer bodies and identities exist – and are placed – within the creative city, and in the wider contemporary political agenda about the creative economy? What are the relationships and tensions which operate in this space? We welcome empirical, theoretical and policy-related abstracts, and are open to receiving proposals for non-traditional presentations. We also welcome abstracts that bring together the literatures around queer geographies, and regional and economic geographies on industrial clusters and cities.

Potential themes include (but are not limited to):
• Queering the constituents of the ‘creative class’, ‘creative city’, ‘creative economy’ and ‘creative industries’.
• Careers, jobs and work identity
• Entrepreneurship and self-employment
• Queer spaces, places, and venues
• Critical race theory
• Queer intersections
• Communities of support and resource mobilisation
• Digital environments and built spaces
• Grassroots innovation, anti-capitalism, contested spaces, and sites of resistance.
• Place branding

We are looking for abstracts of 300 words to be submitted by February 14th 2014 to Georgina Voss (gsv20@sussex.ac.uk)

References
Chapain, C., Clifton, N., & Comunian, R. (2012) Understanding Creative Regions: Bridging the Gap between Global Discourses and Regional and National Contexts. Regional Studies, 47:2. 131-134.
Florida, R . (2002). The Rise of The Creative Class, and How It’s Transforming Work, Leisure, and Everyday Life. New York: Basic Books.
Florida, R. and Gates, G. (2001). Technology and Tolerance – The importance of diversity to high-technology growth. Washington, DC: Urban Institute.
Markusen, A. (2006) Urban development and the politics of a creative class: evidence from a study of artists. Environment and Planning A, 38;10. 1921 – 1940
Peck, J., (2005). Struggling with the Creative Class. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 29:4. 740-77

MONDAY 17th February: The Ageing Queer populations of London

(7pm, The Boardroom, 309 Regent Street)

This panel discussion will explore the challenges, opportunities and difficulties facing London’s ageing queer populations. How do older queer populations experience London and how do they read it differently? In part, the event will also consider how soap operas offer a frame through which London’s ageing queer populations might understand the city and its issue. Speakers for the event include Kate Hancock (Opening Doors London), Dr. Nicola Humberstone and others (tbc).

TUESDAY 18th February: University of Westminster Queer Film Night screens Touch of Pink (2004), followed by a Q&A with director Ian Iqbal Rashid.

(7pm, New Lecture Theatre, 4-12 Little Titchfield Street, *Please note that this event is in a different building*)

FRIDAY 21st February: London’s Queer Literatures

(7pm, Room 451, 309 Regent Street )

For this event we will be joined by a number of writers whose work engages intricately with the relationship between London and queerness, all of who will be reading from their work. We’re excited to welcome Jonathan Kemp (London TriptychThe Penetrated Male Body), Neil McKenna (Fanny and StellaThe Secret Life of Oscar Wilde) and others (tbc).

The reading will be followed by a wine reception.

Further details for all the events, including biographies of the participants, are available on our website (http://queerlondonforum.wordpress.com/lgbt-history-month-events/).

Places for all the events are free, but limited, and so please register by emailing queerlondonresearchforum@gmail.com clearly stating which event you’d like to attend.

If you’d like to be added to the new Queer London listserve, and to stay updated about future events, you can join by sending an email to listserv@jiscmail.ac.uk Subject: BLANK Message: SUBSCRIBE QUEERLONDON Firstname Lastname

Queer @ King’s, Autumn 2013

Friday 15 November, Screening, 5.30pm, King’s College Strand Campus, Room S-2.18

Ruins: A Chronicle of an HIV Witch-Hunt, Zoe Mavroudi 

A documentary about a shocking case of HIV criminalization in Greece, Ruins tells the story of the persecution of HIV-positive women who were detained by the Hellenic Police, forcibly tested, charged with a felony, imprisoned and publicly exposed, when their mug shots and personal data were published in the media in the run-up to the country’s 2012 elections.

Followed by round table discussion with the director, Zoe Mavroudi, and members of KCL staff, Stathis Kouvelakis, Hector Kollias and Toni Mac from the Sex Worker Open University collective.

This event is free, but will require a reservation – http://ruins.eventbrite.co.uk/
Thursday 5 December, 6.15pm, King’s College Strand Campus, Nash Theatre

“our Virgin names”: Queering Eden in The Memoirs of Miss Sidney Bidulph’,  Rivka Swenson (Virginia Commonwealth University)

The Memoirs of Miss Sidney Bidulph (1761) by Frances Sheridan is a self-reflexive novel that tests the limits of what is arguably the primary formal paradigm for eighteenth-century British novels: the genre of the nostos, the tale of return. But if felicitous return is paradigmatic for the century’s hero-centered novels (with complications in the Gothic), Sheridan’s novel exposes, challenges, and confirms the gendered limitations of the return-plot for its heroine Sidney. From the first page forward, Sidney yearns to return to a prelapsarian golden time at her mother’s family seat, Sidney Castle, as she expresses repeatedly to her childhood friend, Cecilia, in letters marked by an affect that exceeds the usual warmth of the period’s epistolary effusions.

Sheridan dedicated her novel to Samuel Richardson, and her novel engages the limitations of Richardsonian form, specifically the generic expectation that heroines may enable heroes to regain or exteriorize a compromised heroic virtue or lost identity, but cannot themselves enjoy such recovery. Sidney excoriates herself for “murmuring” against “Fate,” but her murmurings are in part a self-reflexive commentary upon form itself: the gendered as well as heteronormative parameters of nostos. In fact, the novel’s real crisis is not the hoped-for reunion of the Penelopean Sidney and her husband following his dalliance with a Circean enchantress, but Sidney’s longing to re-achieve her intimacies with Cecilia in an impossible queer “Eden.”

This event is free to attend, booking is not required.

Thursday 12 December, 6.30pm, King’s College Waterloo Campus, B5 Auditorium

United in Anger: A History of Act Up, Sarah Schulman (CUNY) 

Sarah Schulman will present her documentary, United in Anger: A History of Act Up, directed by Jim Hubbard. This is a unique feature-length documentary that combines startling archival footage that puts the audience on the ground with the activists and the remarkably insightful interviews from the ACT UP Oral History Project to explore ACT UP (the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) from a grassroots perspective – how a small group of men and women of all races and classes, came together to change the world and save each other’s lives.

The film takes the viewer through the planning and execution of a half dozen exhilarating major actions including Seize Control of the FDA, Stop the Church, and Day of Desperation, with a timeline of many of the other zaps and actions that forced the U.S. government and mainstream media to deal with the AIDS crisis. UNITED IN ANGER reveals the group’s complex culture – meetings, affinity groups, and approaches to civil disobedience mingle with profound grief, sexiness, and the incredible energy of ACT UP.

This event is free, but will require a reservation – http://ahistoryofactup.eventbrite.co.uk/

Please also note the following dates for 2014:

13 February: Romana Byrne (Toulouse) will be discussing her new book, Aesthetic Sexuality: A Literary History of Sadomasochism, in a paper concentrating on her concept of aesthetic sexuality and what this means for Foucauldian approaches to the history of sexuality.

27 March: Johan Andersson (KCL) is a Lecturer in the Department of Geography at King’s College, London with research interests in urban queer culture, geographies of religion and cultural representation and political economy.

8 May: Christine Quinan (Utrecht) works in the fields of French studies and Gender Studies. She has undertaken research on the relationship between torture and gender and has published articles on French philosopher Simone de Beauvoir and on Algerian writer Assia Djebar.

19 May: Jasbir Puar (Rutgers) we are pleased to welcome Associate Professor of Women’s & Gender Studies at Rutgers University and author of Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times (Duke University Press, 2007), Jasbir Puar, to speak at Queer @ King’s.