I’m curating a series on the politics of data for the LSE Impact Blog. Would you like to contribute? Get in touch if so. Here’s an overview of the project:

Our latest series delves into the politics of data. Data has become an increasingly complex force, influencing more and more aspects of social life. This series will explore the role of data and algorithms in research and society, critically interrogating data-driven processes and epistemologies. This series was coordinated by Mark Carrigan (@Mark_Carrigan) and the full collection of posts will be collated below. For more on this topic, also see Mark Carrigan’s interview series on the Philosophy of Data Science and the Discover Society special issue on the Politics of Data (Science).

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/the-politics-of-data-series/

The Politics of Data (Science)

This special issue of Discover Society will explore the political implications of ‘big data’ and the systems of expertise emerging around it, including though not limited to Data Science. In doing so it will aim to bridge the gap between the methodological discourse surrounding data science and the political discourse beginning to emerge around ‘big data’. Here are some of the questions the issue will address:

– How is ‘big data’ understood and acted upon? How should we understand its cultural power?
– How is ‘big data’ reconfiguring the social sciences? Do we risk all science becoming data science?
– How and why has the ‘data scientist’ come to be seen as the ‘sexiest job of the 21st century’?
– Is the ‘data scientist’ just a ’Statistician who lives in Shoreditch?’ Or is this a genuinely new intellectual role?
– Can ‘big data’ address ‘big questions’? If not, is this a problem?
– What are the precursors of ‘data science’ within the academy and/or within corporations?
– What implications does corporate data science have for the relationship between corporations & consumers?
– What implications does national security data science have for the relationship between the state & citizens?
– Can the use of digital data lead to efficiency savings in public services? How does this relate to the politics of austerity?
– How could predictive privacy harms emerging from data analytics be addressed politically?
– Can the opacity of algorithmic processes be challenged? Or are we heading inexorably for a ‘black-box society’?
– How are new forms of digital data reconfiguring activity in particular social environments?

However these are just suggestions and ideas beyond the scope of this list are very welcome.

The deadline for contributions is June 15th. Contact mark@markcarrigan.net to discuss a potential contribution.

The article will constitute the July issue of Discover Society. Most articles will be 1500 words however there are a number of special sections in the online magazine.

Front line – 1500 words
View point – 1500 words
Policy briefing – 1500-2000 words

If you would be interested in writing one of these thematic sections, please get in touch asap.

The issue will follow the usual formatting guidelines of Discover Society. Please consult the notes for contributors.

The Politics of Data (Science)

This special issue of Discover Society will explore the political implications of ‘big data’ and the systems of expertise emerging around it, including though not limited to Data Science. In doing so it will aim to bridge the gap between the methodological discourse surrounding data science and the political discourse beginning to emerge around ‘big data’. Here are some of the questions the issue will address:

– How is ‘big data’ understood and acted upon? How should we understand its cultural power?
– How is ‘big data’ reconfiguring the social sciences? Do we risk all science becoming data science?
– How and why has the ‘data scientist’ come to be seen as the ‘sexiest job of the 21st century’?
– Is the ‘data scientist’ just a ’Statistician who lives in Shoreditch?’ Or is this a genuinely new intellectual role?
– Can ‘big data’ address ‘big questions’? If not, is this a problem?
– What are the precursors of ‘data science’ within the academy and/or within corporations?
– What implications does corporate data science have for the relationship between corporations & consumers?
– What implications does national security data science have for the relationship between the state & citizens?
– Can the use of digital data lead to efficiency savings in public services? How does this relate to the politics of austerity?
– How could predictive privacy harms emerging from data analytics be addressed politically?
– Can the opacity of algorithmic processes be challenged? Or are we heading inexorably for a ‘black-box society’?
– How are new forms of digital data reconfiguring activity in particular social environments?

However these are just suggestions and ideas beyond the scope of this list are very welcome.

The deadline for contributions is June 15th. Contact mark@markcarrigan.net to discuss a potential contribution.

The article will constitute the July issue of Discover Society. Most articles will be 1500 words however there are a number of special sections in the online magazine.

Front line – 1500 words
View point – 1500 words
Policy briefing – 1500-2000 words

If you would be interested in writing one of these thematic sections, please get in touch asap.

The issue will follow the usual formatting guidelines of Discover Society. Please consult the notes for contributors.

I’m going to this, workload permitting:

The ESF Research Network for Digital Methods in the Arts and Humanities (NeDiMAH), in conjunction with the Europeana Cloud (eCloud) project wishes to invite applications to attend a one-day workshop investigating potential uses for APIs in Humanities and Social Science research.

The workshop will take place on Wednesday 17th December in The Hague, Netherlands.

Who is this workshop for?
We are looking for participants that might fall into two categories:
•    Humanists and Social Scientists who have no or very little previous experience of using APIs to obtain big data-sets, but are keen to learn of the potentials (approx 10 spaces); and,
•    Developers who work with Humanities and Social Science themed data-sets (approx 2 spaces).

Aims of the workshop
We aim to determine the current state of the art of API use, the barriers, practices and justifications, and develop a workflow that non-technical as well as technically competent humanists can follow in order to obtain big data sets using web services and APIs.

In doing so, it will bring together researchers from the Humanities and Social Sciences (AHSS) who have not (knowingly) used APIs in their research before, but are keen to learn new digital methods, and software developers who make use of AHSS data.  Participants will hear of the potential uses of APIs in AHSS research, and will take part in a practical session to design an experiment using APIs and web-services.  By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to envisage the uses of APIs in their research, and perhaps design their own studies using APIs from Cultural Heritage Institutions.

The outcomes of this workshop will also help the Europeana Cloud project in its continuing developments of and improvements to the Europeana Portal.

Funding
Travel costs and reasonable accommodation costs can be reimbursed by NeDiMAH for a small number of accepted applicants from countries who are currently in the NeDiMAH network.  You can see a list of those countries here: http://www.nedimah.eu/Contributing-Organisations (please note, while listed, Germany is no longer a contributing country to NeDiMAH). If you wish to be considered for this, please make this clear in your application.

How to apply
Spaces for this workshop are very limited.  For this reason, we might not be able to accommodate all applicants to this workshop.  In order for us to assess your suitability, please emailvicky.garnett@tcd.ie with a one-page (A4) document outlining the following:

•    Your current research
•    Your current research institution
•    Your contact details
•    Your experience of digital methods to date
•    What you hope to gain from the workshop

To comply with ESF funding regulations, preference will be given to applicants from countries who are currently in the NeDiMAH network.

Applications must be received no later than 5pm (GMT) on Friday, 7th November, 2014.