Can capitalism survive climate change?

From The Uninhabitable Earth pg 162-163:

The question is a prism, spitting out different answers to different ranges of the political spectrum, and where you fall on that range probably reflects what you mean by “capitalism.” Global warming could cultivate emergent forms of eco-socialism on one end of the spectrum, and could also conceivably produce a collapse of faith in anything but the market, on the other. Trade will surely endure, perhaps even thrive, as indeed it did before capitalism—individuals making trades and exchanges outside a single totalizing system to organize the activity. Rent-seeking, too, will continue, with those who can scrambling to accumulate whatever advantages they can buy—the incentive only increasing in a world more barren of resources, and more mournful of recent apparent abundance, now disappeared.

One thought on “Can capitalism survive climate change?

  1. Man; you read a lot. I guess that’s kind of your job though. 🙂. I think I was destined not to be an academic from the start because I have always read extremely slowly and for whatever reason I was good at hiding it maybe. At least, none of my teachers ever assessed me for reading speed or something like that.

    Anyways..

    If indeed the climate is changing because of human activity then I would make an argument that there is no climate change without capitalism.

    Because the climate is always changing, if we are having an impact or are making a change in a different way than it should, then it must be exactly the ideas that we are having which allow the context by which climate change has meaning as a human involvement. And there is no possibility of having a contact outside of capitalism except to say that there is a context that is outside of capitalism, which then is existing within the context of capitalism itself. Climate change and capitalism are inseparable. And so when the climate actually changes to a significant degree that there is no more capitalism, there will be by definition no more climate change — except the fact that the climate is changing all the time. The measurements we make to show human involvement in the world necessarily show the significance of human involvement because the way that we are understanding it is exactly the context of our understanding of it, which is necessarily involved with the human being in a climate . 🥦😆

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

About Mark