Tag: blogging

One of the more elusive benefits of blogging has been the implications for my professional identity. As a part-time PhD student, without funding but committed to an academic career trajectory (albeit at times waveringly), I found myself engaged in a diverse array of short term roles within the academy. Some of these had clear relevance […]

One of my favourite academic blogs is Understanding Society. Written by the philosopher Daniel Little, it covers a diverse range of topics across the social sciences while continually coming back to a number of core theoretical questions that fascinate me. Reflecting on its seventh anniversary, Little offers some interesting thoughts on the role that academic blogging plays in his […]

This is a good list by John Danaher. Read it in full here: 1. It helps to build the habit of writing: 2. It helps to generate writing flow states: 3. It helps you to really understand your area of research: 4. It allows you to systematically develop the elements of a research article 5. […]

Earlier this week, NatCen Social Research hosted a meeting between myself, Chris Gilson (USApp), Cristina Costa and Mark Murphy (Social Theory Applied), Donna Peach (PhD Forum) and Kelsey Beninger (NSMNSS) to discuss possible collaborations between social science bloggers in the UK and share experiences about developing and sustaining social science blogs over time. We didn’t do […]

I just used the Getty Images plug in for the first and it’s great – absolutely seamless search & embed for hundreds of thousands of high quality images. Unfortunately they can’t be used as featured images (I checked the license) but otherwise they’re completely free for non-commercial use.

I think I registered my Blogger account in December 2003 (during the Christmas holiday of my first year at university) so it seems I’ll soon have been blogging for 11 years. It seems slightly careless of me not to have preserved my earlier blogs, much like I regret losing pictures I’ve taken or things I’ve […]

These are the four options I’ve suggested in my chapter on this: Listing blog posts as individual publications under a specific subheading of your publications list e.g. giving ‘blog posts’ the same status as ‘conference presentations’ or ‘book reviews’. This might be most suitable for people who primarily submit guest posts to other websites. Listing […]

The potential role of blogs in helping disseminate working papers and other grey literature is something that has fascinated me for a long time – I’m curious about all the interesting unpublished work that is sitting in people’s filing cabinets, either to one day be worked up into a formal paper or perhaps doomed to remain […]

I’m reading Jodi Dean’s Blog Theory. It’s very good. However the vocabulary is frustrating me for the kind of reasons I discussed here. Take this example: Conceived in terms of drive, networked communications circulate less as potentials for freedom than as the affective intensities produced through and amplifying our capture. (pg 31) I’m fairly certain […]

Milena Kremakova just introduced me to the notion of a “commonplace book” – as the (very interesting) website below details, many of the ways in which academics are coming to use blogs mirror the features of the (once much more common) commonplace book: The books served as repositories of the thoughts of others, as places for capturing the […]

Online Writing Workshop Wednesday 2nd July 10.00-16.30 Wolfson Research Exchange What is the purpose of the workshop and who is it for? This is a one-day workshop aimed primarily at Early-Career Researchers (including PhD students) in the social science community who are interested in increasing their knowledge of blogging and writing for the web for […]

Online Writing Workshop Wednesday 2nd July 10.00-16.30 Wolfson Research Exchange What is the purpose of the workshop and who is it for? This is a one-day workshop aimed primarily at Early-Career Researchers (including PhD students) in the social science community who are interested in increasing their knowledge of blogging and writing for the web for […]

What a brilliant idea. Find out more here about how to contribute. We’ve been thinking a lot at #NSMNSS about what types of activities the network should support next. One idea we’ve been ruminating on for a while is creating a volume of crowdsourced blogs on the impact social media are having on social science research methods. (We […]

The paradox is that we academic scribes are not always very sociable. We cling to the library like bookish limpets that, like Kierkegaard, find real human beings too heavy to embrace. We speak a lot about society but all too often listen to the world within limited frequencies. I am proposing an approach to listening […]

It’s a common assumption that ‘bloggers’ and ‘blogs’ are unavoidably intertwined. There’s a sense in which it’s true but it can also be slightly misleading. It’s possible to be a blogger without having your own blog. In fact, there are a lot of advantages to doing this. Patrick Dunleavy and Chris Gilson from the LSE […]

After a long period of monopolising academic discourse, European universities went into decline as classical scholasticism, which was primarily inward and backward looking, gave way to the ideas of Enlightenment. Intellectual development moved outside the walled gardens of academia, because enlightenment thinkers shifted their various discourses into the realm of correspondence, creating a Republic of […]

I wrote a few months ago about the potential value of the Medium blogging service for academics. It’s one of a range of new services which are popping up (see Kinja, Svbtle and Ghost) that differ from older platforms in a range of ways. Given the effective hegemony of WordPress, an obvious question is posed […]