The institutional health of Sociology in the UK

I’ve been under the impression that Sociology’s institutional health has been declining in the UK for some time: less A level students and less undergraduates means less capacity for the discipline to reproduce itself institutionally. It turns out this is a great example of the necessity of continuing to check, as I’d assumed the negative trend when I first became interested in these issues (the early 2010s) had been ongoing. However as the BSA CEO Judith Mudd points out these numbers have been increasing for over five years:

The number of students sitting Sociology A Level exams has been steadily increasing since 2014. There were 38,994 in 2020.

The number of applications to undergraduate Sociology degree courses has been steadily increasing since 2014. There were 44,840 in 2019.

The number of accepted applications for undergraduate Sociology degree courses has been steadily increasing since 2013. There were 9,125 in 2019.

https://es.britsoc.co.uk/12-reasons-to-be-cheerful/

One thought on “The institutional health of Sociology in the UK

  1. Does the number of applications for undergraduate Sociology degree courses include multiple applications – or are universities failing to supply sufficient places to meet the demand. If the latter, then this is something which sociologists as a profession should be seriously concerned about. Sociologists should ensure that as many citizens as possible have access to the ideas and tools that sociology can provide.

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